Liberal activist says Southwest told her to cover Biden sign because ‘many customers are offended’

A liberal activist was given a taste of the left’s own medicine as she departed on Southwest from the home of one of the most expansive election audits and was told to cover her sign displaying President Joe Biden’s name because many passengers found it offensive.

Jenny Grondahl brought a cardboard sign onboard the flight from Phoenix to San Diego on Friday that read “Arizonenses Con Biden.”

The sign was a gift from a friend recognizing her work for the Biden campaign and featured a drawing of a cactus by artist Javier Torres, according to a report by The Washington Post. The liberal advocate is also a member of the executive board of Laborers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA) which has members in Arizona and California.

“I worked very hard to register Latino voters. … And Latinos showed up, Arizona went blue,” she told The Washington Post.

At the gate, a Southwest employee approached her and asked her to cover the sign or fold it and put it under her seat because “many customers are offended by your sign.” Grondahl indicated that the agent was “very nice.”

Grondahl questioned if it had been a T-shirt what would be done and was told she would have to turn the T-shirt inside out.

She opted to fold the sign and place it under her seat.

“I’m looking around at the gate, and I’m thinking, how many of you was it — 20 out of 110 people? And how offended were you? What did you say?” she said after the. “How could people have such a visceral reaction to seeing the name of our president on a sign?”

One has to wonder if she took issue with a then-sitting President being banned from Facebook and Twitter? Was it concerning to her that even the voice of Donald Trump has been banned by Facebook?

“It’s in Spanish. I just looked around, and I thought about humanity in general. How devastatingly horrible that someone saw a name, or a different language, on a sign that I’m carrying, and stood in line to complain to the airline staff to the point that they then had to come complain to me, and asked me not to bring this on board?” Grondahl said.

When a ticket is purchased it comes with a “contract of carriage” that can create a dress code of sorts for passengers that is largely enforced at the discretion of the airline staff. Southwest and Jetblue include a restriction on a passenger’s attire if it is “lewd, obscene, or patently offensive.” Delta’s dress code draws the line if the attire, “creates an unreasonable risk of offense or annoyance to other passengers.”

“I just think [Grondahl] ran into a buzz saw with a flight attendant, who was trying to placate some unhappy people,” said Tom Demetrio, a lawyer from Chicago who represented a United Airlines passenger who was forced off the plane in 2017.

Southwest Airlines did reach out to Grondahl on Twitter and a spokesperson responded to an inquiry from The Washington Post.

“We pride ourselves on providing a welcoming, comfortable, and safe environment for all Customers and Employees regardless of political beliefs. We’re in conversations with the Customer to address her concerns and we hope to welcome her back on a future Southwest flight,” read an email from Southwest spokesman Dan Landson.

Ashley Hill

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