Fauci ‘very concerned’ about Sturgis rally spreading Covid; Chicago lollapalooza, not so much

A “very concerned” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the goal-posting-moving director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has suggested that the Sturgis motorcycle rally could be a super-spreader event for COVID-19.

Although Fauci seems to spend most of his time on TV talking about the coronavirus and its variants rather than looking through a microscope or studying data about the pandemic, he apparently has made no public comment about last week’s Chicago-based Lollapalooza music festival.

That omission would also be a failure on the part of the agenda-driven corporate media.

This morning, NBC’s Meet the Press host Chuck Todd asked vaccine hawk Fauci, Joe Biden’s chief medical adviser, about a possible COVID infection uptick from the South Dakota biker event which is purportedly attracting 700,000 participants. Todd claimed that last year’s gathering, with only about 100,000 on hand (although the attendance may have been much higher), led to a big outbreak.

“Well, I’m very concerned, Chuck, that we’re going to see another surge related to that rally,” Fauci responded.

“I mean, to me it’s understandable that people want to do the kinds of things they want to do, he continued. “They want their freedom to do that. But there comes a time when you’re dealing with a public health crisis that could involve you, your family and everyone else, that something supersedes that need to do exactly what you want to do.

“I mean, you’re ultimately going to do that in the future, but let’s get this pandemic under control before we start acting like nothing’s going on. I mean, something bad is going on. I mean, we’ve got to realize that.”

Watch:

(Video: NBC)

As alluded to above, Todd conveniently avoided raising a similar question about the Lollapalooza music festival in Chicago with 100,000 attendees in close quarters during each of its four days in late July, however.

Could the difference be that there are perhaps “a few” more Trump supporters in Sturgis rather than in Chicago?

Speaking of Chicago, check out the crowd below:

Fauci has also separately conceded that even without a federal vaccine mandate or passport, once the FDA approves the experimental medicine, public and private sector entities could create a flood of de facto mandates.

Last year, South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem asserted that a study about the alleged Sturgis massive outbreak promoted by the media had no factual basis and was mostly speculative.

“We have in South Dakota 124 cases that were tied to the Sturgis motorcycle bike rally out of half a million people that came,” she insisted.

In the summer of 2020 Dr. Fauci seemed to have no inclination of warning about large-scale BLM protests. During congressional testimony about a year ago, the career federal bureaucrat recommended avoiding crowds of any kind, but also said that “I don’t judge one crowd versus another crowd.”

In June 2020, the liberal Axios news outlet reported the following:

When protests broke out against the coronavirus lockdown, many public health experts were quick to warn about spreading the virus. When protests broke out after George Floyd’s death, some of the same experts embraced the protests. That’s led to charges of double standards among scientists.

Why it matters: Scientists who are seen as changing recommendations based on political and social priorities, however important, risk losing public trust. That could cause people to disregard their advice should the pandemic require stricter lockdown policies.

 

Circling back to Lollapalooza, Chicago’s soft-on-crime, lockdown-loving far left Mayor Lori Lightfoot is under fire and being called a hypocrite after she attended the music festival where attendees went maskless, didn’t social distance, and merely waved proof of vaccination to enter ahead of her imposing COVID restrictions on the city.

Fox News host Greg Gutfeld recently quipped that “Right now we have health experts sending more mixed messages than an MRI of the president’s brain.”

Robert Jonathan

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