VP Harris dragged for talking down voter ID, declaring rural Americans can’t ‘Zerox’ identification

Democrats have apparently opened up a new, but equally absurd, line of attack against voter ID laws, this time in the context of rural voters.

In a BET interview, out-of-touch Kamala Harris lamented that voters outside of the cities and suburbs supposedly lack access to photocopying machines.

Harris was responding to a question from Soledad O’Brien as to whether she would favor a legislative compromise with Republicans on the stalled For the People Act, as it is called, that would include a voter ID provision. For Harris, the answer is apparently no.

“I don’t think that we should underestimate what that could mean, because, in some people’s mind, that means, ‘well, you’re gonna have to Xerox or photocopy your ID to send it in to prove that you are who you are,'” Harris — who spent most of her professional career in the San Francisco area before heading to Washington, D.C. — claimed.

“There are a whole lot of people, especially people who live in rural communities, who don’t — there’s no Kinko’s, there’s no Office Max near them. People have to understand that when we’re talking about voter ID laws, be clear about who you have in mind and what would be required of them to prove who they are. Of course, people have to prove who they are, but not in a way that makes it almost impossible for them to prove who they are,” Harris added in the video clip embedded below.

Even Democrats like U.S. Rep. James Clyburn, the House Majority Whip, have flip-flopped on on voter ID, which he previously categorized as voter suppression, however. Democrats traditionally considered producing an ID at the polling place the equivalent of waterboarding.

Perhaps Harris, who has expressed concern about so-called food deserts, is implying that photocopying deserts exist in rural areas.

In an expansion of their victimology theme, concerns for rural voters, who tend to vote Republican, and their lack of photocopiers, is a plot twist for liberals. Traditionally — and without real evidence — they have paternalistically and insultingly insisted that minority voters lack the wherewithal to obtain a government-issued photo ID, and thus the requirement is discriminatory.

Americans from all walks of life and backgrounds know that a photo ID — which is readily and routinely available at the DMV — is necessary to operate in day-to-day life, however, and poll after poll indicates that the country overwhelmingly supports photo ID to vote.

As a side note, Harris may not have visited a retail store or browsed any on online recently, because multi-function printers are relatively inexpensive. She may or may not be up to date on business news, either, in that Office Max merged with Office Depot in 2013, and FedEx previously acquired Kinko’s, but that’s an entirely different matter

Separately, O’Brien tossed a softball to Harris by suggesting that Joe Biden was overworking his VP by giving her so much responsibility (much of which, in practice, is ceremonial) in the administration, such as supposedly being in charge of responding to the border crisis.

“Maybe I don’t say ‘no’ enough,” Harris replied, according to Fox News. “But I do believe that these things are achievable. It’s just a lot of hard work, but that’s why we’re here and that’s what people wanted. Right?”

Harris’ stereotypical comments (which she attributed to the minds of some people) about rural voters, which suggest that she is less familiar with those areas than even the border region where she was a late arrival, prompted ridicule on social media. Here is a sampling:

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Robert Jonathan

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