BLM activist steps down from school board; accused of molesting over 60 immigrant children

Tay Anderson, a noted Black Lives Matter activist and former Denver school board member, was forced to step down from his position after it was made public that he was being investigated for allegedly molesting a large number of students.

Denver Public Schools confirmed that they knew about the allegations and that the Denver Police Department is also privy to the information.

This came after Mary-Katherine Brooks Fleming, mother to three children, testified before the House Judiciary Committee that there was “a sexual predator targeting DPS children” during a hearing on legislation that would make it easier to sue businesses that hired child sexual abusers.

Anderson issued a statement on Twitter which made it clear that he was not admitting to the crimes, but was simply putting space between himself and the school board for the time being.

Apparently this isn’t Anderson’s first rodeo with these types of heinous allegations.

He was already being investigated for an alleged sexual assault on a student from April. His lawyer, Christopher Decker, fervently denied the accusations against his client, saying false claims of sexual assault “cheapen and diminish its importance” in a statement to The Denver Post.

“Nothing is worse or more unacceptable than the harm caused by sexual assault upon our children, or the related harm caused by not believing those who have been victimized in this way. This is also why false assertions of these horrible crimes act to cheapen and diminish its importance. It is because of these two truths that responsible people and organizations must carefully investigate such inflammatory claims completely, and with an open and fair process.”

 

Despite the denials, Brooks Fleming insists that 62 students had requested her help with one particular person within the school, but didn’t give a name. She claims that the students involved described the alleged acts against them, including instances that could be described as unwanted touching, or even violent “acts of rape.” She also alleges that 61 of the people involved were either illegal aliens or DACA recipients. The youngest alleged victim, she says, is 14-years-old. Brooks Fleming accused the unnamed assailant of targeting children who had no access to medical care and/or could not report the act to authorities due to fear of their immigration status being made known.

“Those who came to my home didn’t have health insurance, couldn’t afford emergency rooms, and even if they could, they wanted to avoid mandatory reporters for fear that such an interaction could jeopardize their family,” she testified. “It is horrifying to realize that someone had preyed on these children, knowing their silence was guaranteed.”

The Denver Post published a brief statement from the Denver Public School board in response to the woman’s testimony:

“The Board was made aware of testimony at the Colorado Capitol this week and was later informed that the accusations were against Director Tay Anderson. The Denver police are also aware of these accusations.”

Anderson, for his part, tweeted a statement acknowledging the situation but not his alleged part in it.

As previously mentioned, Anderson is a BLM activist in the Denver area, and his Twitter is full of statements like this: (** Language warning)

But Tay Anderson isn’t the only issue Black Lives Matter has had recently.

Rashad Turner, a self-dubbed “insider” in BLM and the founder of the St. Paul, Minnesota chapter, announced the “ugly truth” behind the organization, and has stepped down from his position in disgust.

Turner went from justifying “pigs in a blanket, fry ’em like bacon” to revealing the festering underbelly of a group that claims to care about the welfare of black children, but doesn’t do a thing to improve their conditions.

“I want the same success for our children in our communities. That’s why in 2015, I was a founder of Black Lives Matter in St. Paul. I believed the organization stood for exactly what the name implies: Black lives do matter,” he said. “However, after a year on the inside, I learned they had little concern for rebuilding Black families, and they cared even less about improving the quality of education for students in Minneapolis.”

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