Cuomo orders release of 1,100 parole violators from jails, citing coronavirus as excuse

(New York State Governor’s Office)

As America’s Democrat governors continue to tighten the noose around their constituents, restricting their civil rights in ways once thought unimaginable, they conversely continue to extend great leniency to society’s most vile reprobates.

In New York, for example, on Friday the administration Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, ordered the release of 1,100 parole violators.

“[A] state agency told parole officers that 1,100 parole violators who are being held in jails and prisons across New York will be released,” the Albany Times Union reported. “The parolees, who include 600 in New York City jails, will be returned to supervised release.”

During a late Friday phone interview with MSNBC, the governor claimed the lucky 1,100 had “violated parole for non-serious reasons.” For reasons that remain unclear, he also sought to defend his highly controversial and unrelated bail reform measures.

“We passed one of the most sweeping bill reform bills in the history of the State of New York, so we’re incarcerating fewer people than ever before and taking special measures for this virus situation,” he said to MSNBC propagandist Chris Hayes.

For example, we’re releasing people who are in jails because they violated parole for non-serious reasons. And wherever we can get people out of jails, out of prisons now we are. We also put in additional protections in the prisons to try to protect both the workers and the prisoners.”

Listen below from the 7:50 mark:

His claim about the soon-to-be-released parole violators having “violated parole for non-serious reasons” is dubious because that’s the same sort of rhetoric his administration has used to defend its bail reform measures.

“Starting in January, judges across New York will have less discretion when a defendant first appears,” Spectrum News reported late last year.

“There’s no more cash bail for most misdemeanor and nonviolent felony arrests. … If you’re accused of one of those crimes you’ll be issued an appearance ticket. The expectation is you’ll go back to court for your next court date instead of possibly sitting and waiting in jail.”

Note the use of the terms “misdemeanor and nonviolent felony arrests.”

The impression that Cuomo gave when signing the measure into law was that only criminals charged with relatively minor crimes would benefit. This turned out to be a lie.

In a Facebook post published in October, the Oneida City Police Benevolent Association warned that the measure would also apply to criminals accused of assault in the third degree, criminally negligent homicide, manslaughter in the second degree and a host of other disturbing crimes.

Look:

As of January 1st – the list of laws one WONT get held on bail for in New York!!
(Which basically means that the police…

Posted by Oneida City Police Benevolent Association – PBA on Tuesday, October 1, 2019

The association’s prescient post proved to be more accurate than expected.

Two months ago, six drug dealers who were arrested on allegations of trying to push $7 million worth of the deadly opioids fentanyl and heroin onto the streets of New York and New England were immediately released because of this measure.

That same day, a suspected two-time bank robber who’d been freed because of the measure was announced as a fugitive.

“He’s out there, somewhere, able to commit another crime,” Nassau Police Commissioner Patrick Ryder reportedly complained at the time.

“It’s insane when you think who we’re letting out of jail. It has nothing to do with justice reform. We’re not protecting the victims, and we’ve swung the pendulum way too far.”

And a month earlier, in anticipation of the then-impending bail measure, officials in one New York town released an illegal alien suspect whose actions had led to the death of a mother of three.

Learn more below:

If the governor’s definition of a “non-serious” offense is the same as last time, it could bode badly for the law-abiding citizens of his state.

The New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision has for its part reportedly claimed the “non-serious” offenses include failing a drug screen, failing to report to a parole officer or failing to report a change in residence.

“Following an individualized review, the Department began canceling any warrant where the individual has identified adequate housing is available and the release of the individual does not present an undue risk to public safety,” the agency reportedly said in a statement.

“This significant action is being taken in response to a growing number of COVID-19 cases in local jails over the past few days and weeks. Our top priority remains the public health and safety of New Yorkers during this global public health emergency and this measure will further protect a vulnerable population from contracting and transmitting this infectious disease.”

This leniency toward criminals comes amid a slow erosion of civil rights.

“[G]rowing segments of the U.S. population say state and federal governments are trampling on freedoms central to American life in the name of protecting public health,” the Associated Press reported Friday.

“The case is already being made. A church-goer in New Hampshire says prohibitions against large gatherings violate her religious rights. A Pennsylvania golf course owner argues that gubernatorial edicts shuttering his business amount to illegal seizure of his private property. If civil libertarians aren’t yet sounding alarms, many have their hands hovering over the button.”

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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