Ronald Reagan’s shooter will likely get his wish to vote because, unbelievably, he can

The would-be assassin of President Ronald Reagan is free and eligible to vote for Hillary Clinton for president in the upcoming 2016 election, reports say.

John Hinckley, who tried to assassinate Reagan on March 30, 1981, was released from St. Elizabeth’s Mental Hospital last Friday and lives with his mother in Williamsburg, Virginia.

“Surely nothing about this case” will keep Hinckley from the polls, Hinckley’s lawyer, Barry Levine, told the Washington Times. “I suspect he’ll register to vote.”

Hinckley was charged with 13 crimes, but was found not guilty by reason on insanity and was released from federal custody on Aug. 18, 1981, though he was committed to St. Elizabeth’ in Washington, D.C., after his trial ended.

Now, according to reports, Virginia law maintains Hinckley is fully qualified to vote, so he will finally get his chance.

To lose voting rights in Virginia one has to be deemed “mentally incompetent” or have been convicted of a felony. Believe it or not, Hinckley isn’t a convicted felon and was never deemed mentally incompetent, so state law says he can register to vote.

Yes, even though he was deemed insane, he was never deemed “incompetent.”

“Unlike sanity, competency is the ability to understand the charges against you and to cooperate with counsel in the defense,” Hinckley’s lawyer noted. “He’s never been deemed incompetent.”

The legally insane wannabe killer has complained many times before that he was not able to vote.

“In the past two years I have become much more politically aware and I can now see what’s going on in this country. But I can’t speak out or vote to try to change the system because the hospital and government won’t let me,” Hinckley said in a 1984 letter to The Washington Post.

Records show Hinckley tried to register to vote in his parents’ home state of Colorado in 1984, 1986 and 1990, but he was refused each time. He also tried to sue the DC Board of Elections in 1990 for the right to vote, but lost.

Still, now that U.S. District Judge Paul Friedman — not surprisingly a Jimmy Carter appointee — has given Hinckley a full release order, the one-time shooter will be eligible to vote this year at last.

Hinckley will become the first attempted assassin of a U.S. president in history to regain his voting rights.

Comments

Latest Articles