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Study says nearly two-thirds of vaxxed Americans will BAN un-jabbed family members during holiday gatherings

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The holiday season has long been a source of contention for many families, but this year families may be even more divided with almost two-thirds of fully jabbed Americans reportedly planning to ban their unvaccinated relatives from holiday festivities.

The November 2 study by OnePoll analyzed the responses of 2,000 U.S. residents about how the COVID-19 vaccine has influenced relationships with loved ones.

Fully vaccinated individuals accounted for 65 percent of respondents and nearly six out of 10 of those respondents had already severed ties with unvaccinated family members.


(Video Credit: 72 Point U.S.)

Conservative author Andrew Sullivan explained that he believes families that do still get together will still likely have heated debates over their Thanksgiving turkey.

“There’s a lot of what you might call rough and tumble shut-up rhetoric and that’s healthy,” Sullivan said in an interview on CBS’s 60 Minutes that is scheduled to air on Sunday. “What is not healthy is when that isn’t just retained and kept in the political area but becomes personal, becomes something you bring to the supermarket – you bring to Thanksgiving dinner, becomes something that permeates everything.”

“And that separation between politics and life is what we’re losing. And that’s a terrible thing to lose,” Sullivan said.


(Video Credit: 60 Minutes)

Sullivan explained that the divide is putting the 234-year-old American Constitution at risk.

“The American Constitution was set up for people who can reason and argue and aren’t afraid of it, and then reach compromises, the whole thing is designed that way,” Sullivan explained. “If you’re in a tribe, and all that matters is the victory of your tribe…You can’t make it work.”

Although the survey showed a deep divide between the jabbed and un-jabbed, nearly 80 percent of respondents felt that politics should not play a role in medicine or science. Despite this, the chasm is so wide that 72 percent of vaccinated respondents believe they can’t get their unvaccinated family members to realize the importance of the shot. Around half of unvaccinated respondents have cut off communication with family members who don’t understand their refusal of the rapidly-developed injection.

The survey also showed that 14 percent of respondents have no plans to ever get the jab.

One respondent explained this was because that they “don’t trust the vaccine is safe,” and another was “concerned about side effects.” Another cited the shortened development time of the poke and that it doesn’t seem to be preventing illness.

A focus group from earlier this year shed light on the vaccine hesitancy for many people who summed up their skepticism as a lack of facts and far too much face time with Dr. Antony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Very simply they said, “Show us anyone besides Dr. Fauci.

Ashley Hill

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