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Defense atty in Ahmaud Arbery trial under fire for comments on Al Sharpton’s ‘intimidating’ presence in courtroom

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Notorious race hustler Al Sharpton’s courtroom presence Thursday in the trial of the three men accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia provoked one defense attorney into crying foul.

Kevin Gough, the attorney for defendant William Bryan, argued that Sharpton’s presence could be “intimidating” to the jury.

“I have nothing personal against Al Sharpton … but if we’re going to start a precedent starting yesterday where we’re going to bring high-profile members of the African American community to sit with the family during the trial in the presence of the jury, I believe that’s intimidating, and it’s an attempt to pressure,” he argued while the jury was out of the room.

“Jesse Jackson, or whoever was in here earlier this week trying to influence the jury in this case. And I’m not saying the state is even aware that Mr. Sharpton was in the courtroom, I certainly wasn’t aware of it until last night. I think the court can understand my concern about bringing people in who really don’t have any ties to this case other than political interests,” he added.

Listen:

Indeed, Sharpton is an influential figure with power, ergo why jurors might conceivably feel threatened — or pressured, at the very least — by his presence. Especially given the racial nature of the trial, which pits three white men against a deceased man who was black.

“The idea that we’re going to be serially bringing these people in to sit with the victim’s family one after another. Obviously there’s only so many pastors they can have, and if their pastor is Al Sharpton right now, that’s fine, that’s it, we don’t want any more black pastors coming in here,” Gough continued.

His decision to specify “black pastors” instead of just calling for no more pastors, period, predictably drew accusations of racism from the blue checkmark brigade:

But stunningly, it didn’t provoke accusations of racism from Sharpton himself.

The notorious race hustler and grievance monger instead accused Gough of being “arrogant.”

“The arrogant insensitivity of attorney Kevin Gough in asking a judge to bar me or any minister of the family’s choice underscores the disregard for the value of the human life lost and the grieving of a family in need spiritual and community support,” he told TMZ in a statement.

Watch:

As for Eastern Circuit Court Judge Timothy R. Walmsley, he dismissed the complaint from Gough.

“I noticed [Sharpton] once and that was it, and the fact that nobody else even noticed he was in here means that everybody complied with the court’s rulings on sitting in this courtroom and listening to the evidence,” the judge said.

“I don’t hear a motion, and I will tell you this, I’m not going to blanketly exclude members of the public from this courtroom. If individuals, based on the limitations that we have in the courtroom, end up sitting in the courtroom, and they can do so respectful of the court’s process and in compliance with this court’s orders with regard to the order of the conduct of the trial, and they’re not a distraction, then I’m not going to do anything about it, and I did not hear from anyone that there was any distraction whatsoever,”  he continued.

The judge likewise speculated that members of the jury hadn’t even noticed Sharpton sitting beside the family.

Arbery was fatally shot by the defendants when, while trying to question him about some local robberies that he was suspected of having committed, he allegedly attacked them.

Because the defendants are white and Arbery is black, there’s been a general assumption by many that he was gunned down because of racism.

Outspoken black conservative commentator Candace Owens has been a fierce critic of this dubious narrative:

Vivek Saxena

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