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‘Should be ashamed!’ Merriam-Webster jumps in Rittenhouse fray with nasty attack

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Merriam-Webster has seemingly chosen to involve itself in politics (again) by posting a tweet detailing the origins of the term “crocodile tears.”

While there’d normally be nothing untoward about the tweet, it was posted shortly after Kyle Rittenhouse broke down with visceral, body-racking tears while testifying about the events leading up to the moment he’d opened fire during the Kenosha riots last year.

This is highly relevant because immediately following his impassioned testimony Wednesday, leftists on Twitter began accusing him of shedding “crocodile tears.”

And so by suddenly emerging from out of nowhere with the origin story of the term, the dictionary gave the appearance that it was taking sides against Rittenhouse.

To be clear, this isn’t necessarily the case. Whoever’s behind the dictionary’s social media account may have simply been responding to user requests for clarification about the origins of the term.

But given the dictionary’s “woke” track record of injecting itself into politics — and always from the position of the left — many suspect Merriam-Webster’s decision was malicious and purposeful.

It wouldn’t be the first time. After then-White House counselor Kellyanne Conway rightly noted in February of 2017 that contemporary feminism seems to have become “very anti-male” and “pro-abortion,” the dictionary sought to “fact-check” her by posting feminism’s dictionary definition.

Whoever is or was behind the account apparently thought that the dictionary definition of the term somehow negated the myriad examples of contemporary “feminists” openly hating men and celebrating abortion.

More recently, Merriam-Webster decided to rewrite the definition of “anti-vaxxer” to fit the Democrat Party’s claim that an anti-vaxxer includes anyone who opposes “regulations mandating vaccination.” This was never part of the definition.

Critics have not appreciated the dictionary’s descent into “woke madness.” But its latest offense — seemingly helping mock a young, barely 18-year-old man whom the evidence suggests is suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder — was the last straw.

Look:

“Now post one describing PTSD or panic attacks,” the latter Twitter user wrote.

As previously reported, Rittenhouse was only 17 when he traveled to Kenosha in 2020 in the hopes of both providing medical aid and protecting local businesses. He was likewise only 17 when the violent extremists who were decimating the city zeroed in on him next, reportedly telling him that they intended to kill him if they caught him alone.

These same extremists eventually chased and did nearly kill the then-17-year-old. They were stopped only by him opening fire, allegedly in self-defense.

Since that day, all three extremists have been portrayed by the entire left, including the media, as “victims” and good guys, despite all the evidence demonstrating both their intent to hurt Rittenhouse and their propensity for criminality:

Meanwhile, Rittenhouse has been smeared as a “white supremacist” and ruthless murderer, including by even the president of the United States.

Based on the events that unfolded on Aug. 25th of 2020 (as documented in numerous videos), based on the young man’s emotional testimony Wednesday and based on the pain he presumably must have also felt from being smeared for a year straight, many suspect that the young man is now suffering from PTSD.

Either way, it’s clear to most that his tears were legitimate. Indeed, even Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, a grown man who was 53 years old when he was ruthlessly smeared during his confirmation hearings in 2018, couldn’t stop himself from breaking down emotionally from the lies and hatred of the American left …

Vivek Saxena

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