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Gabbard says racially divisive left lack a ‘spiritual foundation,’ cites Youngkin win as ‘message of hope’

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(Video; Fox News)

U.S. Rep. Cori Bush’s bitter rhetorical attack on fellow Democrat Sen. Joe Machin for not supporting the totality of the Biden administration’s big-spending, so-called Build Back Better plan, represents a spiritual deficit on the far-left side of the political spectrum which is incongruent with the meaning of aloha.

That is the assessment of former Democratic Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard, from Hawaii.

“It really just shows again, that this is a symptom of a deeper, a lack of a spiritual foundation,” Gabbard told Steve Hilton on his Fox News show Sunday evening, “where if you’re not able to see someone, regardless of party politics, regardless of your position, whether you agree or disagree, if you’re not able to see another person as a child of God, as someone that you can respect at that fundamental level, as a fellow American, then this is where we see all of this darkness coming from.”

Since leaving Congress, the former 2016 Bernie Sanders supporter and 2020 presidential candidate has risen up as a strong free speech, individual freedom advocate who is, among other things, championing unity.

She is not shy about a willingness to criticize her own political party, including President Joe Biden (whom she previously endorsed) for its rampant divisiveness and failings.

Some may question Gabbard’s underlying motivation, but she has nonetheless emerged as a voice of reason that hardly conforms to the Democrats’ current inflexible, far-left agenda.

“And so it’s no wonder as you were talking about the results in Virginia,” Gabbard continued, “that people chose to respond positively towards that message of hope, and optimism for our future, that message of coming together.

“That message of care and respect for all people. And this is again…this is where I find hope for our future. If we go back to those fundamental values and principles of who we really are, then this is how we can come together,” she added.

The host of “The Next Revolution,” who subtitles his show “the home of positive populism,” added that Americans, regardless of their differences, need to work together in good faith. Gabbard seemed to agree.

“And have the conversation. I think it’s important at a time like this to remember the words of Patrick Henry, in The Federalist Papers. He said let us trust God and our better judgment to set us right hereafter. United we stand; divided we fall, let us not split into factions which must destroy that union upon which our existence hangs. We have to be able to come together recognizing what’s at stake, the peril of our future, if we don’t come together,” Gabbard, a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves, concluded.

Although individuals can possess a high degree of ethics and morals regardless of faith, if any, journalist Jason Whitlock similarly has implied on his podcast that the more a person moves to the left, the more that person moves away from God.

Hilton began the segment by contrasting the way hyperventilating Democrats reacted to GOP standard-bearer Glenn Youngkin’s historic gubernatorial triumph in Virginia (along with Lt. Gov. winner Winsome Sears and AG-elect Jason Jason Miyares) that turned the state red with the optimistic way Gabbard characterized it.

She described it as a “victory for all Americans because it was a resounding rejection of efforts to divide us by race, the stripping of parental rights, and arrogant deaf leaders.”

Gabbard started out the conversation by explaining, at Hilton’s request, the fundamental significance behind the traditional Hawaiian aloha greeting:

First of all, it’s impossible to say aloha without smiling and bringing a smile to someone else’s face. And there’s a reason for that, because it has a very deep and powerful meaning in that when you greet someone with aloha, you’re saying I recognize that we are all children of God. We are all brothers and sisters, we’re all connected.

And I come to you with respect and love and care. And that’s really what it comes down to is, everyone wants to be happy. And so it’s no wonder that we find ourselves in a place where we are miserable, and we are stressed out and frustrated, when it seems like everywhere we turn we see politicians, social media, mainstream media, fomenting fear and anger, hatred, divisiveness, racializing everything.

So when we have leaders who step forward, who sincerely want to do what’s right for the people, who care and treat us with respect, allowing the light of God’s love to shine through, this is where we see there is cause for hope, and optimism and the ability for us to come together as a people to move forward.

 

Robert Jonathan

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