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NFL exec apologizes for saying words ‘China Virus’ after meaning of ‘racist slur’ is redefined

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Houston Texas CEO Cal McNair has apologized for an allegedly gasp-inducing, public comment at a charity function back in the spring.

According to Bally Sports, a racially insensitive remark at a Houston golf tournament prompted the mea culpa.

In a statement, McNair expressed remorse over using the phrase “China virus” which is being interpreted as anti-Asian.

“My comments at the event last May included an inappropriate choice of words. I immediately apologized to people who approached me then and I apologize again now. I know how important it is to choose my words carefully. I would never want to offend anyone.”

Bally sportswriter Michael Silver wrote about the National Football League executive’s transgression:

McNair, addressing more than 100 attendees at the Houston Texans Foundation Charity Golf Classic at River Oaks Country Club, spoke into a microphone just outside the pro shop as participants gathered in their carts before leaving to tee off via a shotgun-start format.

At the end of his brief remarks, according to two witnesses who asked to remain anonymous, McNair – whose family has owned the Texans since they were founded in 1999 – told the crowd, “I’m sorry that we couldn’t get together last year, because of the China Virus.”

As McNair and his wife, Hannah, looked on smirking, some audience members were stunned by the reference to the COVID-19 virus, which had forced the 2020 tournament’s cancellation.

“Everyone gasped,” one witness said, “especially the people directly across from him. He and Hannah seemed to think it was hilarious. It was dead silent.”

Even the corporate media has come around to acknowledging the high likelihood that  COVID-19 may have leaked from the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China.

Silverman recalled that President Donald Trump “help popularize” the term, which the journalist described as “tone-deaf” and is supposedly linked to an increase in hate crimes against Asian Americans.

“The revelation about McNair’s comment comes at a particularly sensitive time for the NFL, which has been rocked by the recent resignation of Las Vegas Raiders coach Jon Gruden in the wake of leaked emails containing racist, homophobic and misogynist content,” Silver added.

“As expected, the cancel culture mob caught wind of the [McNair] news, dropped what they were doing and fantasized about another opportunity to play the victim…While the COVID comment is unlikely to cancel Cal, he sure did give everyone a fright this Halloween week!” Outkick’s Anthony Farris quipped.

The NFL as an organization is also featuring rap artists (from a genre known for vulgar lyrics) in its Super Bowl halftime show in February 2021.

Cal took over the team in 2018 from his dad, the late Bob McNair. In 2017 during an owner’s meeting, the elder McNair said “We can’t have the inmates running the prison,” apparently in the context of player national anthem protests. McNair subsequently apologized.

The elder McNair was a frequent donor to the GOP.

The 1-6 Texans play the Los Angeles Rams on Sunday. The Texans have separately been immersed in controversy for months over the approximately 20 sexual misconduct allegations lodged against former starting QB DeShaun Watson. The team has reportedly been trying to trade Watson, but so far no exchange has culminated.

Although much of social media is condemning McNair for vocalizing a slur, some Twitter users aren’t buying the media narrative. Here is a selection:

Robert Jonathan

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