CDC mulls updating definition of ‘fully vaccinated,’ may require third booster dose in future

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Rochelle Walensky, who has been unreliable in “following the science” when making decisions regarding the coronavirus, is now considering changing the definition of “fully vaccinated” to require three doses of the vaccine.

“We have not yet changed the definition of ‘fully vaccinated.’ We will continue to look at this. We may need to update our definition of ‘fully vaccinated’ in the future,” the CDC Director told reporters earlier this week when asked whether the wider-approval of booster shots will lead to a three shot requisite for Americans who received Pfizer or Moderna, or a two shot requisite for those who received Johnson & Johnson.

“If you’re eligible for a booster, go ahead and get your booster and we will continue to follow,” Walensky recommended.

This latest development comes despite the CDC Director’s acknowledgement in late September that federal health officials were not looking to change the definition of “fully vaccinated” at the time.

Walensky wants to make boosters mandatory after a committee within her own agency voted against recommending booster shots for younger at-risk workers including teachers and frontline medical workers just one month ago.

In fact, the only group the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices panel advised that the booster be recommended for is Americans 65 and older and for those over 50 with underlying medical conditions that put them at greater risk.

The CDC chief is decidedly against the “science” from her agency, opting to instead follow guidance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration who authorized boosters for younger, at-risk workers just one week after their initial rejection of the booster shot for anyone except those over 65 with a high risk of contracting the virus.

Right now, the CDC has approved the mixing and matching of booster shots for Americans who received two doses of Pfizer or Moderna aged 65 and older or aged 18 and older in long-term care. The booster is also approved for those 18 and older who received the J&J vaccine, two months after their first dose.

Some contend that the groups recommended to get a third shot will be expanded sooner rather than later.

There are decided questions about the impact that a booster requirement would have on working Americans as an increasing number of employers require proof of vaccination amid a growing labor shortage. Right now, those kinds of mandates are mostly seen in blue states.

However, there is currently a federal mandate in place that requires vaccination for workers at companies with 100 or more employees. If the requirements to be fully vaccinated suddenly were to include an additional shot, there would be a serious impact on Americans and the labor market.

Australia, which has been making global headlines for their tyrannical and  occasionally violent enforcement of coronavirus restrictions, is among some of the nations worldwide considering requiring a third shot to even be eligible for a vaccine passport according to the Epoch Times.

“We’re going to be getting into booster issues, so it won’t be your first or second dose, it’ll be, ‘have you had, have you had, your third?’ And then the other issue will be, well who knows what variants are coming?” Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews said in a recent press conference, leaving the door open for further government mandates.

Some experts, including Dr. Fauci have tried to explain the science surrounding the push for a third dose. The HPV vaccine, for example does not provide full protection until patients receive all three doses. Some scientists believe that the coronavirus vaccine may be similar.

Part of the reason for that is the short time span between doses. The first two shots for those who received Pfizer or Moderna could potentially act as a single dose, requiring a follow up booster for full coverage.

Americans eager to return to “normal”, however, are becoming fed up with the government’s constant bait and switch tactics and the continued obstruction of freedom when it comes to personal medical choices.

If the definition of “fully vaccinated” were to change, the timeline is murky and it remains even more unclear whether or not most Americans would be willing to subject themselves to a third shot.

Kay Apfel

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