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Marine vet Joey Jones goes off on NYT’s Old Glory redesign, and what he believes is the meaning behind it

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Reacting to the New York Times op-ed proposing a new American flag with several options, retired U.S. Marine Joey Jones described the designs as a practical matter as “ugly as sin.”

More significantly, he implied that the subtext of the idea was an attempt by agenda-driven progressives to erode the country’s national identity by using an influential journalistic platform to divert attention from the real issues.

“I love our flag, and don’t you try to change it,” Jones added on the Fox News Channel on Thursday morning.

“Fox & Friends” co-host Brian Kilmeade began the discussion by asking Jones, in “weaving” through the options, if there was any need to tamper with Old Glory.

The Fox News contributor’s answer was a resounding no, and he went on to address a possible end game behind the flag-redesign idea, an overhaul that was widely scorned on social media.

“They’re gonna attack everything about the fabric of this country, and they’re certainly gonna attack everything that makes us unify around who we are in our social imaginary, our national identity because they want to change that.”

Watch the segment embedded below:

(Video: Fox News)

“And if they can shift that conversation to something arbitrary in their minds, like a flag, then we won’t pay attention to the actual changes they’re making in our schools, and how we allow the government to tell us what to do with our bodies, and things of that nature,” he continued.

“This is a deflect maneuver. And no, we’ve got a flag. I love our flag. And don’t you try to change it….and [they’re] ugly as sin; they’re just ugly designs,” Jones, a veterans’ activist who served as a bomb technician in Afghanistan where he lost both his legs above the knee in an IED incident, concluded.

Jones may or may not have been using fabric in both its literal and metaphorical sense, but he definitely got his point across.

In the essay, the liberal news outlet from which the rest of the corporate media industry often takes its cues characterized the suggested designs in this way: “Some are functional, others artistic renderings; some represent America as it could be, others how the artist sees the country now.”

The so-called newspaper of record also claimed that the flag’s “design shifted frequently until the early 1900s,” although Kilmeade noted that “we’ve added a few stars here and there.”

From time to time, The Times as an institution has seemingly evinced antipathy toward the American flag as a patriotic symbol; some reporters apparently took offense that the banner is embraced by Trump supporters.

Year-zero leftists who seem to favor dismantling various American traditions have also recently stirred up hostility toward America’s national anthem, The Star-Spangled Banner.

In the dialogue with Kilmeade, Jones also briefly weighed in on the two days of Capitol Hill testimony by Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, Marine Gen. and CENTCOM commander Frank McKenzie, and Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman Gen. Mark Milley about the botched U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan and its aftermath.

“At the end of the day, we had 10 civilians killed by a drone strike. And I believe both drone strikes were purely for headlines. And those headlines have turned their ‘cannons’ back toward the president, because they were done in haste, and they were done, it seems, to no effect at all or to the effect of killing civilians,” Jones said, in part.

Robert Jonathan

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