Boston’s acting mayor defies Dem narrative after de Blasio order, compares vaccine passports to slave papers

In somewhat of a surprise, there is at least one Democrat official who apparently has come out against the idea of vaccine passports. In this instance, the politician claims the requirement is a legacy of a very ghastly chapter in American history.

And it’s also President Donald Trump’s fault.

Pro-vax Kim Janey, the acting mayor of Boston, was reacting to a decision by Bill de Blasio, the far-left, lame-duck New York City mayor, to require proof of COVID vaccination to enter certain indoor businesses as of August 16, the first major municipality to do so.

In so doing, Kim Janey invoked slavery and Trump.

“Here in Boston, we continue to focus on vaccine access…we want to make sure that we’re giving every opportunity for folks to get vaccinated, ” Janey told ABC Boston affiliate WCVB Channel 5 on Tuesday as COVID-19 cases reportedly rise in the city. “When it comes to what businesses may choose to do, we know that those types of things are difficult to enforce when it comes to vaccines,

“There’s a long history in this country of people needing to show their papers….During slavery, post-slavery, as recent as, you know, what immigrant population has to go through here. We heard Trump with the birth certificate nonsense,” she continued.

“Here, we want to make sure that we are not doing anything that would further create a barrier for residents of Boston or disproportionally impact BIPOC communities.”

Janey was referring to the controversy, a.k.a. birtherism, over Barack Obama’s birth certificate.

The BIPOC acronym stands for Black, Indigenous and people of color.

Mayor Janey “likened vaccine passports to the papers that newly-freed slaves had to carry around after the Civil War as she dismissed the idea of implementing them in her city ,” the Daily Mail explained.

“Instead, you want to lean in heavily with partnering with community organizations, making sure that everyone has access to the lifesaving vaccine. As it relates to people who want to encourage their workforce to get vaccinated, we certainly support that,” the acting mayor concluded.

Watch:


(Video: WCVB)

Janey, the city council president, became acting mayor in order of succession when incumbent Democrat Marty Walsh headed to Washington to become U.S. Secretary of Labor in the Biden administration.

She is running for a full term in the November 2021 election.

Some of Janey’s progressive rivals, who are all about the science, were quick to pounce on the acting mayor’s remarks.

“When we are combating a deadly virus & vaccine hesitancy, this kind of rhetoric is dangerous. Showing proof of vaccination is not slavery or birtherism. We are too close to give ground to COVID. Science is science. It’s pretty simple – Vax up and mask up,” wrote City Councilor Andrea Campbell.

Another mayoral candidate, Michelle Wu, who also serves on the city council, said that “Anyone in a position of leadership should be using that position to build trust in vaccines.”

Yet another counselor did not mention Janey when tweeting praise for de Blasio’s edict.

If we want to get serious about addressing vaccine hesitancy, slowing the spread of the Delta (and subsequent) variants, and keeping our families, friends, and neighbors safe, then we need to take bold and effective action. We should be doing this in Boston,” Councilor Matt O’Malley declared.

Sensing perhaps that she might be in some hot water, Janey subsequently tweeted out a clarification, to some degree, of her remarks that incuded the usual identity-politics boilerplate. And remember, for her, this is an election year.

Given the left’s authoritarian tendencies, perhaps nothing is off the table.

“Earlier today, I pointed out several hurdles facing communities of color with lower vaccination rates. These hurdles should not be excuses, but we must consider our shared history as we work to ensure an equitable public health and economic recovery.

“While there are no current plans for business sector vaccination mandates, we are using data to inform targeted public health strategies. This includes meeting with restaurants and bars to discuss overlaps between their clientele and new COVID-19 case trends.

“We are working with the hospitality sector to provide vaccine access and information for customers in the form of signage, social media graphics and on-site vaccination clinics.”

In the meantime, U.S. Sen. Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.) plans on introducing legislation that would require any state that requires a vaccine passport as a prerequisite for participating in commerce or recreational activities to also require photo identification to participate in voting.

So far, the Biden administration has ruled out a federal vaccine passport, although it is requiring all government employees to get the jab. And there is, as yet, no state that has implemented a vaccine passport initiative, with about 20 states banning the practice entirely, which could set the stage for a major legal dispute involving federalism if the feds change their tune.

Some private-sector employers, however, are requiring proof of vaccination as a condition of entering their premises.

Robert Jonathan

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