AOC endorses mayor who uses private security to guard her in upscale Brooklyn neighborhood

A Democrat running for New York City mayor on a platform that includes cutting $1 billion from the NYPD budget has previously acknowledged that private security protects her upscale Brooklyn neighborhood.

The situation is “complicated,” the mayoral hopeful admitted.

Candidate Maya Wiley, an attorney who worked for term-limited, far-left Mayor Bill de Blasio, just received the endorsement of U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a vocal defund-the-police fan.

It turns out that residents of the Prospect Park neighborhood, including Wiley’s longtime partner who was a mugging victim, reportedly pay $550 annually for a private security patrol to keep an eye on things.

Wiley told the New York Daily News back in December that “I think it’s ridiculous and we shouldn’t have it. it’s neither effective nor does it create the sense of community that I support. And I don’t think it reflects the actual reality of our community in terms of whether it’s even needed.”

Wiley added, however, what she described as a “complicating factor”: As alluded to above, her longtime partner was seriously beaten in a 2001 mugging that necessitated a six-week period of recuperation. She noted that after nightfall, he tends to walk down the middle street rather than on a dark sidewalk as a result.

“And he said, one night he was coming home from work and he saw the car at the end of the block and it just made him feel better. And so he started paying again and then I had a very hard time saying, ‘don’t do it.’ It’s not necessarily rational but it is his trauma response so it’s a complicated one for our family,” Wiley told the Daily News, in part.

According to the news outlet, after the mugging, Maya Wiley met with the local precinct’s commanding officer and demanded that he do his job.

The winner of the June 22 Democrat primary is almost a lock to win the general election in the city unless the Republican candidate (who has also yet to be decided) scores a stunning upset. Eric Adams, Andrew Yang, and Kathryn Garcia are currently regarded as the front-runners for the Democrats.

The $500 private security price tag divided among multiple families — assuming the fee is not an underestimate — in Maya Wiley’s neighborhood seems like a modest cost. But critics would likely say that Wiley fits into the do-as-I say, not-as-I-do, category of the limousine liberal. That is a term for an elitist, progressive cohort — known as champagne socialists in the U.K. — that seeks to insulate itself from the policies espoused for everyone else.

Over the years, it has also been said that a conservative is a liberal who has been mugged.

Assaults and robberies are surging in the crime-ridden Big Apple. On her website, Wiley admits that shootings alone in NYC have surged by 83 percent this year, creating a “public health emergency.”

Wiley’s solution includes investing the $1 billion redirected from the police “into communities most impacted by gun violence.” She advocates, among other things, an $18 million appropriation to create a “participatory justice program” in those affected neighborhoods.

Wiley vowed in last month’s mayoral debate that “I’m going to take a billion dollars from the New York City Police Department and shift that money to create trauma-informed care in our schools, because when we do that violence goes down and graduation rates go up.”

Wiley has her share of supporters on social media, but others highlighted what happens when theory meets reality. Here is a sampling:

Powered by Topple

Robert Jonathan

Comments

Latest Articles