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Facebook says it will stop removing claim COVID-19 was man-made in a lab. Gee, thanks.

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After over a year of censoring anybody, including scientists, who dared to question the official narrative surrounding the origin of the coronavirus, Facebook is finally relenting now that the mainstream establishment is also questioning its origin.

“In light of ongoing investigations into the origin of COVID-19 and in consultation with public health experts, we will no longer remove the claim that COVID-19 is man-made from our apps,” a Facebook spokesperson said in an emailed statement to Politico.

“We’re continuing to work with health experts to keep pace with the evolving nature of the pandemic and regularly update our policies as new facts and trends emerge,” the spokesperson added.

This abrupt about-face comes as the entire establishment, from top officials like Dr. Anthony Fauci to mainstream media outlets, have gone from maligning concerns about the virus’s origin as “conspiracy theories” to accepting them as potentially credible.

It also comes amid President Joe Biden announcing Wednesday that he’s asked intelligence officials to investigate the origin of the coronavirus and “report back to me in 90 days.”

Politico described this establishment-wide about-face as a “renewed debate,” though as noted by a slew of critics, this “renewed debate” raged for months and months and months before the establishment finally decided to indulge it.

Or rather, dissenters tried to debate this matter for months upon months but were suppressed at every step by establishment players like Facebook.

Look:

While this is a positive development insofar as “debates” about the coronavirus’s origin are now permitted, the problem is that the underlying issue of censorship based on popular sentiment — i.e., whatever the establishment says — still remains.

Case in point: On the same day that Facebook announced its decision to stop censoring discussions about the coronavirus’s origin, it also announced that it intends to double and triple down on its so-called “misinformation” policy.

“Facebook said on Wednesday it would take ‘stronger’ action against people who repeatedly share misinformation on the platform. Facebook will reduce the distribution of all posts in its news feed from a user account if it frequently shares content that has been flagged as false by one of the company’s fact-checking partners,” Reuters confirmed.

It’s as if Facebook learned nothing.

These “fact-checking partners” are the same entities responsible for censoring anybody, including scientists, who broached the idea that the coronavirus may have originated in a laboratory in Wuhan, China.

“Facebook is warning users that articles describing evidence for the theory are ‘Missing Context’ and is steering them to a 2020 fact-check saying there is little evidence for a non-natural origin of the virus,” the Washington Free Beacon reported just two weeks ago.

“The fact-check, which is riddled with grammatical errors, quotes two academic articles and five scientists on Twitter who believe the theory is false,” according to the Beacon.

Only two weeks later, it’s clear the so-called “fact-check” is false, though it’s by no means the only false “fact-check” that’s been used to suppress scientific debate.

As early as February of 2020, Facebook “fact-checked” a New York Post piece by Population Research Institute president Steven Mosher, a scientist, questioning the origin of the coronavirus.

Incidentally, Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee just released a report last week that “appears to refute” the so-called “fact-checkers” who’d “halted dissemination” of the piece, according to Fox Business Network.

Yet Facebook intends to keep using these same habitually false “fact-checks” to censor people, suggesting again that its “fact-checking” isn’t based on actual facts but rather on what the establishment says and thinks — which, it just so happens, is oftentimes 100 percent false.

Vivek Saxena

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