Seth Rogen says comedians should stop whining about cancel culture – ‘saying terrible things is bad’

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Seth Rogen, a far-left Hollywood actor with a penchant for using social media to direct extremely inflammatory, nasty comments at anyone he dislikes, has urged fellow comedians to stop complaining about their careers being ruined over cancel culture.

During an interview Tuesday on “Good Morning Britain,” he admitted that his past movies “definitely” contained offensive content but claimed it’d just been a simple mistake. He then suggested that comedians making offensive comments on Twitter is the real issue.

“I was never a comedian, I don’t think, that made jokes that were truly designed to target groups that were subjugated in some way. Again, have we done that without realizing it? Definitely. Those things are in our movies, and they’re out there and they, I’m more than happy to say, have not aged well,” he said.

“But no, on my Twitter, I have never made a joke that was outwardly horrific in some way. And if you have, I would question why you did that. Saying terrible things is bad. So if you said something terrible, so that’s something you should confront in some way, shape or form. I don’t think that’s cancel culture. I think that’s you saying something terrible,” he added.

(Source: ITV)

His remarks came off as very out-of-touch and elitist to a wide number of social media users because of, one, his lack of acknowledgment of how cancel culture has destroyed careers, and two, his lack of acknowledgment of his own known nastiness.

Even Chris Rock, a legendary comedian 17 years Rogen’s senior, has raised concerns about the explosion of cancel culture and its eroding effect on comedy.

In a recent interview, Rock warned that the fear of getting canceled has led to many comedians not taking risks, which in turn has produced very “unfunny comedians” as well as “unfunny” shows, movies and other forms of so-called entertainment.

“I see a lot of unfunny. I see unfunny TV shows. I see unfunny award shows. I see unfunny movies because no one’s — everybody’s scared to, like, you know, make a move. That’s not a place to be. You know, we should have the right to fail because failure, failure is a part of art,” he said.

As for Rogen, his Twitter feed is teeming with extremely nasty, profane remarks directed at not just high-profile figures in the Republican Party but also everyday Americans, including a Mexican American whom he described as a”piece of stinky s–t.”

Look (*Extreme language warning):

The tweet about “American Sniper,” a biographical film about deceased U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, was so offensive that Rogen was forced to apologize.

“Seth Rogen responded to the outrage incited by a series of tweets he wrote regarding the film ‘American Sniper’ in a statement issued exclusively to the Associated Press on Thursday, saying it wasn’t his intent to offend anyone or to say anything with political implications,” the Associated Press reported at the time.

But had this happened in 2021, there’s a good chance his career would have faced a full-throated cancellation, meaning his career would effectively be over.

Couple all this with his self-righteousness and sanctimony, and it becomes clearer why so many people were annoyed by his most recent comments.

Look:

Vivek Saxena

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