Melania’s fluent in 5 languages; Jill Biden absolutely butchers one rehearsed Spanish line. Folks notice.

First lady Jill Biden was ridiculed on social media after grossly mispronouncing a Spanish term during a ceremony to honor the left-wing labor leader Cesar Chavez.

In speaking to a crowd of about 100 people in California with Gov. Gavin Newsom during an event on Wednesday, Biden butchered the term, “Si, se puede” (Yes, we can), which was made popular by Chavez during the 1970s as he led a movement to unionize farmworkers in Arizona.

“Cesar Chavez understood that no matter the obstacles, when people come together united in a cause, anything is possible. Yes, we can. Si se puede!” Biden said at the event commemorating Chavez’s birthday.

But it sounded like she said, “Si, se pwodway!” which prompted much backlash and mockery online.

“What better way to wrap #CesarChavezDay than with Co-President Dr. Jill Biden butchering ‘Sí Se Puede’ while standing in front of Chávez’ black eagle,” wrote the Media Research Center’s Jorge Bonilla.

“Jill Biden tried #Hispandering and ended up saying ‘Yes, we father!’ (Si se padre) instead of ‘Yes, we can!’ (Si se puede). Not a big deal, but I’m old enough to remember when President Trump’s mispronunciations would consume news cycles,” media strategist Giancarlo Sopo tweeted.

Steve Cortes, an adviser to the 2016 and 2020 Trump campaigns, wrote that it reminded him of “an episode of Veep.”

Others joined in the mockery as well, including many who noted that former first lady Melania Trump is fluent in several languages.

During her speech, Jill Biden spoke of her and President Joe Biden’s alleged union ties.

“He is a union person. I am a member of the teachers’ union. We are a union couple,” the first lady said.

But on his first day in office, the president killed more than 10,000 union jobs when he canceled the Keystone XL pipeline, leaving union leaders like AFL-CIO boss Richard Trumka struggling to spin it.

“I wish he hadn’t done that on the first day because the Laborers’ International was right. It did and it will cost us jobs in the process,” he said in an interview with Axios’ Jonathan Swan.

Trumka added that, should the president sign executive actions costing more union jobs in the future, he should have a plan already in place to replace them.

“If you destroy 100 jobs in Greene County, Pennsylvania, where I grew up, and you create 100 jobs in California, it doesn’t do those 100 families much good,” the AFL-CIO boss said at the time. “If you’re looking at a pipeline and you’re saying we’re going to put it down, now what are you going to do to create the same good-paying jobs in that area?”

The United Autoworkers Union also backed Biden instead of President Donald Trump last year, despite the latter’s enactment of, and commitment to, pro-growth policies including a renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, which was widely viewed as being responsible for hemorrhaging factory jobs to Mexico.

But shortly after Biden took office, the Ford Motor Company announced it would relocate the manufacturing of a next-generation vehicle to Mexico rather than build it at a plant in Ohio. And while the carmaker did not provide a specific reason for the move, it came amid talk within the Biden administration and the Democratic majority in Congress to reverse the Trump-era tax cuts and raise corporate rates from 21 to 28 percent.

“Raising the federal corporate tax rate to 28 percent would make the average state-federal tax burden for American businesses 32.34 percent—the highest rate in the developed world,” Reason magazine reported. “The corporate tax hike alone would reduce long-term economic growth by about 0.8 percent, kill 159,000 jobs, and reduce wages, according to a separate analysis by the Tax Foundation, a nonpartisan think tank.”

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Jon Dougherty

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