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Biden defies protocol, order flags lowered. Set to visit Asian Americans in Atlanta – still no border visit.

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There is a certain media-enabled duality to the Biden presidency, one factor being all about show and the second being about the intended design behind actions taken.

Nowhere was this more apparent than the order Thursday by President Joe Biden to lower American flags at all federal buildings, to include the White House, in honor of the victims of the Atlanta massage parlor shootings.

Eight people were killed earlier this week at three different massage parlors, with six of the eight victims being women of Asian descent. There was an immediate attempt to blame former President Donald Trump and the Republican Party for rhetoric used to describe COVID-19 — after being arrested, the suspect told detectives that he chose the parlors because of a sexual addiction and that race wasn’t a factor.

The proclamation ordering U.S. flags to fly at half-mast through sundown on March 22 also includes all military posts and naval stations, all naval vessels, and at all U.S. embassies, consular offices and other U.S. installations around the world

“As a mark of respect for the victims of the senseless acts of violence perpetrated on March 16, 2021, in the Atlanta Metropolitan area, by the authority vested in me as President of the United States of America, I hereby order that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff,” the proclamation reads.

Lowering the flag is usually reserved for honoring government officials or members of the military.

The U.S. Code of Laws: “By order of the President, the flag shall be flown at half-staff upon the death of principal figures of the United States Government and the Governor of a State, territory, or possession, as a mark of respect to their memory.”

The code also includes foreign dignitaries and “the death of a member of the Armed Forces from any State, territory, or possession who dies while serving on active duty, or the death of a first responder working in any State, territory, or possession who dies while serving in the line of duty.”

With the U.S. border with Mexico on the verge of a full blown humanitarian crisis as Biden-inspired illegal immigrants flock to America, there has been a steady media diet about violence against Asian Americans since Tuesday’s shootings.

The New York Times reported that the shootings “stirred considerable outrage and fear in the Asian-American community.”

The paper added that “investigators said they had not ruled out bias as a motivating factor even as the suspect denied such racial animus once in custody.”

And while Biden showed no interest in visiting the border being overrun by illegal immigrants, many wearing t-shirts with his name on them, the White House said on Thursday the president and Vice President Kamala Harris will postpone a scheduled event in Atlanta to visit with Asian-American leaders to discuss violence against the Asian community.

(They were set to go to Atlanta to tout their $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill.)

“Whatever the motivation here, I know that Asian Americans are very concerned,” Biden said. “I’ve been speaking about the brutality against Asian Americans for the last couple of months.”

And while the administration is reluctant to call the pending disaster on the border a crisis, the Democratic Party is calling violence against Asian-Americans a crisis.

Rep. Judy Chu, D-Calif., disputed the suspect’s denial that race was a factor, declaring with no evidence whatsoever that his choice of targets “were no accident,” according to NPR.

“What we know is that this day was coming,” Chu proclaimed. “The Asian American community has reached a crisis point that cannot be ignored.”

Chu would also blame Trump, saying he “stoked” anti-Asian hate by using phrases like “kung flu” and “China plague,” NPR reported.

Tom Tillison

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