‘Power, control, then FU.’ Red Sox icon Curt Schilling says AIG canceled his insurance over pro-Trump stand

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Boston Red Sox World Series hero and outspoken pro-Trump conservative Curt Schilling claims that a multinational insurance company cancelled his coverage because of his online activity.

That was their reasoning. The agent told us it was a decision made by and with their PR department in conjunction with management,” Schilling explained in a follow-up message that did not identify what kind of insurance was revoked. The insurer has not yet responded to inquiries from the media, however, about this purported decision.

Schilling initially took to Twitter — where he refers to himself as “President-elect Curt Schilling” — to inform his approximately 263,000 followers that “We will be just fine, but wanted to let Americans know that @AIGinsurance canceled our insurance due to my ‘Social Media profile.'”

In a separate, ominous tweet, the ex-MLB right-handed ace insisted that “PLEASE understand that this is and will in no way be a ‘one off’. This is the coming storm, this is the ‘future’ of the nation if we allow [Democrats] the power they fraudulently came into. At their core, this is exactly who they are. Power and control, then FU.”

A cynical or conspiratorial person might wonder if corporate America, which — along with the Democrats — seems to be seizing upon guilt by association after the universally condemned chaos at the Capitol on January 6, intends to perhaps implement a social credit system along the lines of what the CCP is orchestrating in China.

As evidence of his lost coverage, Schilling tweeted out a purported screenshot of a message from what might be an insurance broker that indicates the finality of the decision to stop doing business with the former pro athlete:

“Unfortunately, the underwriter was unable to accept my request. I also went up the chain of … command and asked our AIG Marketing Representative for an exception, but unfortunately, he was unable to grant one. He realized that you were a longtime AIG client since 2004 and also a profitable account (no claims), but it was a management decision that was made collectively between underwriting and marketing teams that could not be overturned.”

Schilling insisted that he had no incentive for making this up. “First off why would I lie about some bullsh*t like this and second? You don’t think they’d be lining up lawyers to sue for defamation/slander/libel RIGHT NOW if I was lying? Hell, I tagged them in the tweet.”

If there is a cause-and-effect relationship between his social media feed and an insurance policy cancellation, the deal-breaker from a public-relations perspective may have been this tweet about the riot at the U.S. Capitol, a horrible incident which was perpetrated by a relatively small group of lawbreakers after a mostly peaceful protest.

No stranger to controversy, you may recall, for example, that ESPN fired Schilling from his gig as a baseball analyst in April 2016 after he posted an anti-transgender meme to Facebook.

The pitching star won three World Series championships, two with Boston and one with the Arizona Diamondbacks. Primarily owing to a stellar post-reason record of 11-2 (overall 216-146, with 3,000-plus strikeouts), the consensus is that he will finally gain election to the MLB Hall of Fame this year. In the past, some baseball writers have publicly acknowledged that politics formed the reason why they declined to vote for him for the Hall.

The AIG story has gained traction on social media, and Schilling is not shy about responding. Here’s a sample:

https://twitter.com/JabberFnJawwww/status/1349333789345009669

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Robert Jonathan

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