Fauci moves goalpost again, claims herd immunity numbers were ‘guestimates,’ CDC changes guidelines

In newly released guidance, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that the people with underlying medical conditions who are at a higher risk for COVID-19 can receive the COVID-19 vaccine as long as they haven’t suffered a severe allergic reaction to any of the vaccine’s ingredients. So far, about two million Americans have received the inoculation.

According to the CDC, an example of such a severe reaction includes “when a person needs to be treated with epinephrine… or if they must go to the hospital.”

The guidance further indicates that there is limited safety data for those with weakened immune systems or with autoimmune conditions, although the agency says that both groups may receive the vaccine.

Among other things, the CDC advises individuals to consult their physician if they have suffered severe reactions to other vaccines in the past to determine if the COVID vaccine is safe for them.

Fox News medical contributor Dr. Nicole Saphier reacted to the new guidance on Fox & Friends.

“When you look at the safety data from Pfizer and Moderna and some of the other vaccines that are going to be coming to market, they do include people with chronic medical conditions, which is a good thing because about 40% of Americans have some form of chronic illness, but they’re usually including the more common ones, high blood pressure, cholesterol, some form of lung disease, and in that, they show it’s completely safe and those people absolutely should be getting the vaccine.”

Noting that those with autoimmune disorders were not included in first-stage clinical trials, Saphier went to say that she herself suffers from an autoimmune disease, and that it is not entirely clear about the effects or the immune response of those in that category from the vaccine.

“But what we do know is this vaccine is incredibly safe unless you have a known severe allergic reaction history, so everyone probably should be getting this vaccine, under the guidance of their doctor, and we have clinical trials now undergoing to make sure that these people are also getting that immunity that they need. We don’t know if it’s going to be that same 95% efficacy, but any sort of immunity is gonna help and really help us move that needle with COVID-19,” she explained.

Saphier said she intends to take the vaccine when it is her turn based on her doctor’s advice because it can help her and potentially those around her.

Watch the entire interview to get the full context:

(Source: Fox News)

Vaccinations are supposed to eventually lead to so-called herd immunity. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases director who seems to spend much of his time interacting with the media rather than studying data, looking through a microscope, or treating patients, is apparently moving the goal posts.

He now says that 70 to 90 percent of the population would need to be vaccinated to reach this goal after previously claiming that 60 to 70 percent would be necessary.

Robert Jonathan

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