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Hundreds of top female athletes band together, urge NCAA not to boycott Idaho over law protecting women’s sports

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(Photo by Leslie Plaza Johnson/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

 

The war against transgender pseudoscience and bullying has reached a new stage thanks to over 300 high-profile female athletes who’ve decided to take a stand.

Following in the steps of women like author J.K. Rowling, 300 former professional, Olympic, and collegiate female athletes signed a letter sent Wednesday to the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s Board of Governors.

In the letter, the women called on the NCAA to abstain from its plans to boycott Idaho for the alleged sin of standing up for women’s rights.

We, the undersigned current and former NCAA and professional female athletes, strongly urge you to reject a recent call to boycott Idaho for passing its Fairness in Women’s Sports Act,” the letter reads.

Such bullying tactics are antithetical to the NCAA values of respect, fairness, and civility, and would send a chilling message to women across the U.S. about the NCAA’s commitment to the integrity of women’s sports.”

Signed into law in March, the Fairness in Women’s Sports Act stops “transgender women” from interfering in female sports on the basis that “boys are boys and girls are girls,” as state Sen. Lee Heider put it after the bill’s passage through the Idaho Senate.

Attorney General Bill Barr agreed. In a statement issued after the radicalized American Civil Liberties Union filed suit against the law, the AG noted that “allowing biological males to compete in all-female sports is fundamentally unfair to female athletes.”

“Under the Constitution, the Equal Protection Clause allows Idaho to recognize the physiological differences between the biological sexes in athletics. Because of these differences, the Fairness Act’s limiting of certain athletic teams to biological females provides equal protection,” he added.

While the case remains under litigation, the NCAA has faced heavy pressure from activists demanding it pull all major sporting events out of Idaho.

The organization eventually responded to the pressure last month by announcing plans to discuss the law during its next Board of Governors meeting in August.

“Idaho’s House Bill 500 and resulting law is harmful to transgender student-athletes and conflicts with the NCAA’s core values of inclusivity, respect and the equitable treatment of all individuals,” the organization said.

“Further, Board of Governors policy requires host sites to demonstrate how they will provide an environment that is safe, healthy, and free of discrimination, plus safeguards the dignity of everyone involved in the event. As such, the NCAA Board of Governors was scheduled to discuss the legislation and its implications to student-athletes at its August meeting.”

The letter sent Wednesday is designed to convince the NCAA to not turn its back on Idaho.

“Fairness for female athletes should not be a political or partisan issue. We athletes have diverse views on many topics, but stand united on this fact: protecting the integrity of women’s sports is pro-woman, pro-fairness, and consistent with the purpose and promise of Title IX,” the letter continues.

“Each one of us has benefited personally, and many of us professionally, from a fair and level playing field. We have achieved striking success in the sports we love, and we are committed to preserving the same equality of opportunity for future female athletes. We strongly believe that everyone should have the opportunity to compete, but true athletic parity for women demands that women’s sports be protected for biological females.”

While this shouldn’t be a controversial issue, it’s become politicized because of the left, as usual, which has sought to prop up virtually every minority group, including the transgender community, at the expense of everybody else.

And in doing so, they’ve screwed over young ladies like Madison Kenyon, an Idaho State University athlete who’s been pushed down in rankings because of a man.

“During the fall 2019 cross-country season, I was told we’d be competing against a male who identifies as female. This biological male had competed on the male cross-country team for three years before identifying under a female name. In the men’s division, the athlete had recorded times in several events faster than the college women’s national record,” she wrote last month for the Idaho Statesman.

“The stats were discouraging. But the stats got personal when I raced in the 3-mile, 5k, and 6k events. In all three, this athlete beat me by a significant margin, bumping me down to a lower placement than I would have notched had I only competed against other women. That might not seem like a big deal, but any athlete knows that placements matter.”

She’s one of countless young girls and women who’ve been sidelined because of people like Jonathan Eastwood, a male Minnesota college track athlete who transformed into a “transgender woman” after a history of losing nearly every competition against other males:

(Video screenshots)

And then there’s biologically male Canadian cyclist Rachel McKinnon, who won a women’s world championship last year:

The letter sent by the 300 athletes concludes by pointing out the indisputable reality that “comparably fit and trained male athletes have innate physiological
advantages over females.”

“Team USA sprinter Allyson Felix holds the most World Athletics Championship medals in history. Yet in 2018 alone, 275 high school boys ran faster times in the
400-meter on 783 occasions. Even the world’s best female Olympic athletes would lose to literally thousands of male athletes—including those who would be considered second tier in the men’s category—on any given day,” it reads.

“Testosterone suppression does not undo these physiological advantages. We do not want to watch our athletic achievements be erased from the history books by individuals with all the inherent athletic advantages that come from a male body.”

Vivek Saxena

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