Trump points to political zealots and media after bomb scare, time to stop ‘endless hostility,’ set a ‘civil tone’

In response to the attempted bombings this week of various political figures, President Donald Trump has called on both those in the political realm and the in demonstrably left-wing media to tone down their oftentimes unnecessarily hyperbolic rhetoric.

“Those engaged in the political arena must stop treating political opponents as being morally defective. You have to do that,” he said at a rally Wednesday evening in Wisconsin. “The language of moral condemnation and destructive routine — these are arguments and disagreements that have to stop.”

Demagogues on the left in particular have a tendency to demonize their conservative opponents as racists, xenophobes, fascists and even Nazis. Their rhetoric against the president himself has been especially foul, with numerous Democrats having compared him to deceased Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler.

“No one should carelessly compare political opponents to historical villains, which is done often. We should not mob people in public spaces or destroy public property,” he added, referencing repeated instances of left-wing politicians urging their constituents to harass or even attack Republicans.

“The media also has a responsibility to set a civil tone and to stop the endless hostility and constant negative and oftentimes false attacks and stories. Have to do it.”

Listen:

Judging by the left’s own response to the attempting bombings, neither those in the Democrat Party not those in the media have any interest in setting “a civil tone” and stopping “the endless hostility and constant negative and oftentimes false attacks and stories.”

This is evident by the left’s rush to blame the attempted bombings of left-wing billionaire George Soros, former President Barack Hussein Obama, former Attorney General Eric Holder, former CIA Director John O. Brennan, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Rep. Maxine Waters on the president.

“[T]he rhetoric that comes out of that White House is not helpful at all. There’s collateral damage, and it has got to stop. And it’s getting worse. And I blame the rhetoric out of that building, out of the White House. It comes from the top, the president of the United States,” CNN White House correspondent April Ryan bluntly opined Wednesday evening.

She based her assertion on the unproven, conspiratorial theory that the attempted bombings had been perpetrated by a conservative supporter of the president. No evidence exists to prove this.

Listen:

It’s unclear why Ryan referenced the president’s allegedly hostile rhetoric while at the same time using the term “collateral damage.” It was Democrat House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, not the president, who earlier this month explicitly warned that those who don’t agree with the Democrat Party’s agenda may suffer “collateral damage” if and when the party regains control of Congress.

Numerous other media figures have echoed the CNN correspondent’s rhetoric, despite no evidence having emerged to prove the failed bombings were attempted by a Trump supporter

Look:

Some in the media have even gone so far as to twist’s the president’s words and accuse him of deflecting blame from himself and threatening them:

It’s unclear why the president ought to essentially blame himself for a criminal act whose perpetrator still remained unidentified.

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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