Will Hijab Barbie come with instructions on how to obey Sharia Law?

What Barbie doll collection would be complete without a “Hijab Barbie” to round out the set?

Social justice warrior Barbie connoisseurs everywhere can rest easy now because Gisele Barreto Fetterman is about to make hijabs available to those who want to cover up their Barbies from those prying, lustful eyes of Ken.

According to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Fetterman got the idea after she and her 5-year-old daughter held a “doll march” on Washington in solidarity with January’s Women’s March.

Although most dolls were included – a disabled doll, a black doll, a doll with glasses – Fetterman asked her daughter, Grace, if anyone was missing. It was then that they both realized there were no Muslim dolls.

“That seemed wrong,” Fetterman told the Tribune-Review. “The refugee population coming in is mostly Muslim, and they are not welcomed by everyone, which is painful to see. Of course, there are children among the refugees. But there are no dolls for them.”

After Fetterman and a Muslim friend, Safaa Bokhari, whose daughter is one of her daughter’s playmates, couldn’t find any Muslim dolls online, they decided to remedy the situation by producing small, colorful cloths that can be folded into little Barbie-sized hijabs.

Their product, “Hello Hijab,” will be available for purchase in April.

“My dream is that every school, with all the dolls they have, will have at least one,” Fetterman said. “If they play with it as children, when they become adults and see someone with a hijab they’ll be more accepting.”

The hand-made hijabs are expected to be produced by Pittsburgh Muslim seamstresses for a wage of $15/hr, and sell for $6 each, according to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

Fetterman says the proceeds will go to the ACLU, the Islamic Center of Pittsburgh, and Community Blueprint Pittsburgh.

Ironically, the Tribune-Review article reports that Fetterman’s mother moved her family from Brazil to the United States in 1990 to seek a “safer environment,” and yet, Fetterman gleefully tells the newspaper that “there will always be people who find the negative, but we choose to find the positive in all things and that includes all people from all parts of the world. My 5-year-old will say, ‘Why can’t they all move here? It’s more people for me to play with!’ I feel the exact same way.”

Which begs the question, if we import everyone from everywhere, won’t this country eventually be just like the places they came from?

In other words, quite unsafe.

Op-ed views and opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of BizPac Review.

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Scott Morefield

Scott Morefield is a news and opinion columnist for BizPac Review. In addition to his work on BPR, Scott's commentary can also be found on Townhall, TheBlaze, The Hill, WND, Breitbart, National Review, The Federalist, and many other sites, including A Morefield Life, where he and his wife, Kim, share their marriage and parenting journey.
Scott Morefield

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