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House Republicans pushing to rein in EPA’s ‘secret science’ regime

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Fed up with the agenda of “far-left environmental groups,” House Republicans have introduced a law to force the Environmental Protection Agency to publish all the research it uses to craft new regulations – and rein in those that put a “crippling financial burden on economic growth in this country.”

The Secret Science Reform Act was sponsored by Rep. David Schweikert, R-Ariz., according to Fox News. Its backers include Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, and the chairman of the House Science Committee.

madscientist0207“The American people foot the bill for EPA’s costly regulations, and they have a right to see the underlying science,” Smith said in a statement. “Costly environmental regulations should be based upon publicly available data so that independent scientists can verify the EPA’s claims.”

That sounds so sensible it should go without saying, but it doesn’t – not when EPA regulations are such a key part of the Age of Obama’s executive orders meant to appease the president’s liberal base at the expense of the economy and jobs, particularly in the energy industry.

“Public policy should come from public data, not based on the whims of far-left environmental groups,” Schweikert said in a statement.

“For far too long, the EPA has approved regulations that have placed a crippling financial burden on economic growth in this country with no public evidence to justify their actions,” he said in a written statement.

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GOP members on the science committee have been battling with the EPA for years over the Obama administration’s war on coal — the “dirty” power source that just isn’t as hygienic as those pristine solar panels and windmills liberals love that together don’t produce even 5 percent of the country’s energy.

As to the EPA’s resistance — or outright hostility — to the natural gas revolution that’s remaking the country’s energy production, Smith accused the agency last summer of being complicit with environmental interests focused on “finding ways to restrain, if not stifle, the new development.”

The “secret science” bill is set for a hearing next week, according to The Hill. Even if it passes the House, it has almost no chance this year in the Senate, where Democrats are in power at least until after November’s election. Even if it passed both chambers, it’s unimaginable President Obama would sign a bill constraining his powers and those of an agency he controls.

But the Obama White House’s abuse of its executive powers is what makes the law worth fighting for.

“Virtually every regulation proposed by the Obama administration has been justified by nontransparent data and unverifiable claims,” Smith said.

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