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Skirt-wearers may not be thrilled by New York attraction with mirrored floors

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Modest New Yorkers and tourists alike may want to do a little research before visiting the city’s latest attraction which features mirrored floors.

Summit One Vanderbilt is an observatory deck next to Grand Central Station that bills itself as “New York’s most thrilling view”– some may argue for more reasons than one.

The deck’s mirrored floors have forced Summit to implement a suggested dress code so that exhibition-goers in dresses or skirts don’t risk becoming an exhibition themselves.

The dress code, however, serves as more of a warning to attendees who don’t want strangers peering up their skirts. For those who are less shy, or less modest– no one will stop them from projecting their underwear around the mirrored observatory.

 

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The creator of the latest Manhattan Attraction works under a nom de plume of sorts, disguising their identity with the company, Kenzo Digital.

In a press release about the exhibition, Kenzo Digital said it, “shares the intoxicating sense of aspiration and inspiration that New York gives … A beacon of possibility that pays tribute to all that New York is, can be, will be.”

As nice as that sounds, unwittingly catching a glance of a stranger’s bloomers may be enough to even make some pant-wearing attendees blush.

Summit management was reportedly alerted of the fashion faux-pas during focus group sessions that took place prior to the observation deck’s public opening.

In response, they added a “dress code” section to the FAQ page on their website:

“Due to the nature of the space and presence of reflective and transparent flooring materials, we recommend wearing pants, shorts, or tights to enjoy the full SUMMIT experience. For guests uncomfortable walking on reflective surfaces, we do offer a non-reflective privacy path throughout the space,” the site suggests.

The New York Post attended Summit’s opening day and noted that most attendees did adhere to the dress code advice, opting to wear leggings or jeans.

Some brave and perhaps some ill-informed souls, however, skirted the recommendation.

The Post informed New Yorker Gamara Makulch, 66 who wore an ankle-length skirt of the potential issue, but she didn’t seem to mind.

“It’s OK,” Makulch told the Post.

Eunice Li, a 30-year-old tourist from L.A. admitted to the Post that she saw the dress code recommendations online but chose to wear a dress anyway.

“It doesn’t really bother me,” she said.

Daisy Esdrello came all the way from Mexico to celebrate her 32nd birthday in the city and told the paper that she ignored the advice because “a skirt looks much better in photos.”

Her husband agreed, snapping away while Esdrello posed in front of the windows as though he were her personal paparazzi.

One attendee was rather crafty. Hailey, 33, of Washington Heights, wore a long summer dress and when the Post asked her about her fashion choice, she responded, “I’m wearing shorts underneath. It wasn’t worth the risk.”

For anyone caught off guard by the mirrored floors and their leaving little to the imagination, Summit provides a pair of stretchy black shorts to any discomforted attendees.

Summit will no doubt become an Instagrammer hot spot with its incomparable views and plethora of mirrors. However, management may get more than they bargained for with attendees paying to see another view.

Kay Apfel

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