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‘This is so F–ked’: KISS guitarist Paul Stanley is furious over TX school administrator’s latest move

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In a response that flew under the radar, Paul Stanley, co-founder, rhythm guitarist and co-lead vocalist of the iconic rock band KISS, blasted a school administrator in Texas who reportedly told teachers last week that because of the state’s recently enacted requirement that “both sides” of current issues be covered, they’ll need to promote both sides of the Holocaust as well.

Gina Paddy, the Carroll Independent School District executive director of curriculum and instruction, was recorded making the remarks during a training session with teachers on what books they’re allowed to use in class

“We are in the middle of a political mess, and you are in the middle of a political mess. And so we just have to do the best that we can. And so we’re gonna go and we’re gonna do, you’re gonna do what you do best, and that’s to teach kids,” she is heard saying on the audio, and when asked for an example of how to apply the law, Paddy responded, “As you go through, just try to remember the concepts of HB 3979, and make sure that if, if you have a book on the Holocaust that you have one that has an opposing, that has other perspectives.”

Stanley, who was born Stanley Harvey Eisen, was raised Jewish and considers his heritage foundational to the person he is today, according to Jewish Exponent. The rocker did not take kindly to that assessment.

“This is so F*CKED. There will ALWAYS be ‘opposing views’ but there are NEVER opposing FACTS,” Stanley tweeted.

According to The Texas Tribune, the state law says “teachers cannot be compelled to discuss current events and if they do, they must ‘give deference to both sides.’” The bill was signed into law over concerns that teachers are indoctrinating students in racial essentialism, among other radical left-wing ideologies, as BizPac Review reported last week.

Paddy’s remarks were seen as an “overreaction” and a “misinterpretation” of the bill.

“We find it reprehensible for an educator to require a Holocaust denier to get equal treatment with the facts of history. That’s absurd. It’s worse than absurd. And this law does not require it,” Clay Robison, a spokesman for the Texas State Teachers Association, said.

The original author of the bill, state Sen. Bryan Hughes, stressed that her interpretation was wrong.

“That’s not what the bill says. I’m glad we can have this discussion to help elucidate what the bill says, because that’s not what the bill says,” Hughes told NBC News.

Stanley’s father was a first-generation Polish immigrant and his mother was from Berlin .

“My mom indeed was born in Berlin and lived through just a horrific, horrific and a heinous time and, with her mom and stepdad, fled, left everything behind and fled to Amsterdam and ultimately was uprooted from there once again,” Stanley told Jewish Exponent.

Pointing to genetic testing, Stanley said he’s 99.9 percent Ashkenazi Jew and finds Judaism very pure.

“I think that at its core, Judaism is, I think [Hillel] said, it’s really treating people the way you would want to be treated and the rest of it is just exposition on that,” he said. “That resonates beautifully.”

As the article noted, he has a shared Jewish heritage with his bandmate, KISS bassist Gene Simmons, who was born Chaim Witz in Haifa, Israel, to Hungarian immigrant parents — Simmons’ mother and uncle were reportedly the only members of the family to survive the Holocaust.

The bandmates share a camaraderie in being children of Jewish immigrants who came to the U.S. after harrowing ordeals, the weekly Philadelphia newspaper noted.

“What we’ve seen is that Jews are resilient,” Stanley said. “So I think that Gene and I always shared a work ethic and a core value of what’s right and wrong and a sense that it’s all about hard work and there’s no shortcuts.”

Stanley had plenty of support online… here’s a quick sampling of some of the responses from Twitter:

Tom Tillison

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