Powered by Topple

End of cancel culture? Leftist fury over alleged ‘your hood’ racist rant takes surprising twist

Powered by Topple

Get the latest BPR news delivered free to your inbox daily. SIGN UP HERE


CHECK OUT WeThePeople.store for best SWAG!

The viral “your hood” incident from last Saturday that led to the firing of a white woman may possibly just be the straw that breaks cancel culture’s back.

The incident involved a known race hustler, Frederick Joseph, accusing a white woman of telling him and his fiance to “stay in our hood.”

A cell phone recording by Joseph didn’t capture the woman saying those words, but it did show him and his fiance hassling the woman over the alleged words.

Following the now-viral incident, Joseph doxxed the woman and then began lobbying for her to be fired from her job at Bevy, a software company.

His effort proved successful.

His successful lobbying generated immediate backlash, which isn’t surprising. What is notable is the unusual caliber of some of the people who complained about his behavior.

Chief among these unusual people is Nikole Hannah-Jones, a race hustler herself who’s responsible for the creation of the pseudo-historical 1619 Project.

In a stunning, unanticipated tweet posted on Monday in direct response to Joseph’s gleeful announcement that he’d gotten the woman fired, his fellow race hustler bluntly wrote, “This…doesn’t feel right.”

Look:

She later doubled down in a tweet directed at someone else.

Look:

The tweets were absolutely astounding given her own modus operandi.

While some left-wingers responded to them by lecturing her that she was wrong, and some right-wingers responded to them by mocking her for the sudden about-face, most people responded by sharing their agreement.

Some also responded by predicting that this may have been the moment that cancel culture finally jumped the shark.

“When Nikole Hannah-Jones says an anti-racist ‘lesson in accountability’ amounted to an unethical use of someone’s Twitter platform and a disproportionate punishment, that should set off alarm bells,” libertarian commentator Jen Monroe noted in an Arc Digital post.

“Could this be the moment when cancel culture has finally jumped the shark? … The incentives for social media mobbing and ‘cancellation’ won’t disappear overnight. But the pushback against it, and from unexpected corners, does offer some hope that we can start moving toward a more considerate form of anti-racism,” she added.

Monroe also drew attention to other examples of Joseph exploiting his fame to target other people — oftentimes for stunningly petty reasons.

Two years ago he accused a white fellow airline passenger of having “white privilege” because the passenger decided to lay down since the other two seats in his row were empty.

Joseph even admitted that “plenty of people do this who aren’t white” but still doubled down on his dubious accusation of so-called “white privilege.”

Look:

Then, earlier this year, he complained about photos of a model posing with a bear, claiming that it demonstrated white people’s alleged fear of blacks.

Look:

But at least these incidents were real.

“In 2018, he claimed that his white female seatmate on a United Airlines flight put her feet up on her tray table, refused to take them down when he politely asked her to, and was finally offered a $1000 voucher by a flight attendant to put her feet down. United responded that no offer of compensation was ever made,” Monroe reported.

“And on another occasion, Joseph was indisputably caught aggrandizing a story for attention (with no racial element),” she added.

From 2020, the latter fake story involved a white Airbnb host whom Joseph falsely accused of being a Satanist. But when Vice magazine, a fairly far-left outlet, interviewed the host and checked out the home, they discovered that he was lying again.

“Joseph said that he and his family members were forced to flee the house after finding ‘imagery, candles, books, etc for rituals and what looked like devil worship.’ Both the host of the Airbnb property in question and the Church of Satan have weighed in to dispute his description of the house and its contents,” Vice reported.

“In a video call with Motherboard, the host was able to take us on a walkthrough of the house and show convincingly that many of the alleged markers of ‘Satanic’ activity are art books and kitschy objects. Joseph also claimed the house’s basement had ‘ritualistic markings’ on the floor, which, from our viewing, is flatly untrue,” Vice added.

The guy is both a race hustler and “serial fabulist,” as some call him, and thanks to this race-obsessed liar, cancel culture just took a big hit.

Vivek Saxena

Comments

Latest Articles