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Chamber of Commerce targets ‘existential threat’ posed in Dems massive reconciliation bill

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The $3.5 trillion reconciliation bill going through congress has caused plenty of controversy, and riled up plenty of foes. One of them, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, is getting vocal about it.

The powerful lobby launched a new, hundred-thousand-dollar ad campaign on Wednesday, urging more moderate Democrats to stop the enormous bill from going through. The ads are aimed specifically at Representative Cindy Axne (D-IA), Representative Angie Craig (D-MN), Representative Antonio Delgado (D-NY), Representative Josh Harder (D-CA), and Representative Elaine Luria (D-VA).

The president of the Chamber of Commerce, CEO Suzanne Clark issued a statement saying, “This reconciliation bill is effectively 100 bills in one representing every big government idea that’s never been able to pass in Congress. The bill is an existential threat to America’s fragile economic recovery and future prosperity,” Fox Business reported.

“We will not find durable or practical solutions in one massive bill that is equivalent to more than twice the combined budgets of all 50 states. The success of the bipartisan infrastructure negotiations provides a much better model for how Congress should proceed in addressing America’s problems,” Clark continued.

The controversial bill is reportedly attempting to radically overhaul and boost federal spending on education, child care, family leave, among other things. The formal legislation is not yet public, and so there is speculation on which proposal will be adopted to try to fund the bill. One such proposal is to hike the corporate tax rate from 21 percent to 28 percent, and taxes on wealthier Americans (how “wealthier” will be defined and how much harder they will be taxed is not yet clear). This would effectively reverse the 2017 tax law Republicans had passed.

As the target of the ads suggest, the bill’s support is hardly unanimous, even among Democrats. To pass, the Democrats need every single member to vote the party line, something that they may not be able to do. There will almost certainly be no support from Republicans, nor moderate Democrats from conservative states like Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV), or those from conservative districts in liberal states, such as the aforementioned Representatives, who have signaled hesitancy on the bill.

Other groups have joined forces to oppose the bill as well, such as the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), and the Business Roundtable. They have, however, given support to the $1 trillion infrastructure package approved by the Senate earlier this month. That infrastructure bill, however, is also threatened by Democrats who are currently less than a united front.

Instead of absolute conformity, Democrats have found themselves squabbling amongst themselves to try to appease everybody, such as the recent infighting over funding Israel’s Iron Dome.

The more moderate wing clearly has misgivings about spending another $4 trillion on two massive bills while already in massive deficits from Covid-19, while the progressive wing is upset that the bill doesn’t include enough of their social justice agenda, such as mandating abortion rights into law nationwide.

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