Afghan refugee had explosive materials boarding flight to US, stopped at Ramstein Air Force Base

U.S. screeners reportedly stopped an Afghan refugee who was attempting to board a flight from Germany to the U.S. while carrying explosive materials in his luggage.

Officials are implying that there is nothing to see here, having apparently excluded the possibility of any terrorism connection because he reportedly was an Afghan contractor for the U.S. government engaged in counterterrorism activities and the materials discovered during a physical search were “work related.”

Multiple U.S. agencies are investigating the incident that occurred at Ramstein Air Force Base in southwestern Germany.

The man, who is said to be in his 30s, is now on the no-fly list, which the Transportation Security Administration calls the red list.

“Screeners, including a member of the German military assisting the U.S….found five blasting caps, one igniter switch, a ‘def cord’ and one shock tube when the refugee was apprehended late Monday morning German time, according to officials and the TSA summary report,” Just the News reported. “It was not immediately clear how the man got the explosive materials inside Ramstein, but officials said they were working on the hypothesis that he had brought them with him from Afghanistan during his evacuation.”

“Though the man wasn’t suspected of ill intent, the incident is a poignant reminder that the rushed evacuation and processing of refugees from a country with significant terrorist sympathies poses risks, although officials stressed the pre-flight screening did in fact work as it should,” the news outlet added.

U.S. authorities may also want to consider the logic of somebody fleeing a war-torn country for a safe haven allegedly packing munitions-related items in his carry-on luggage.

“The pieces of equipment were described as items readily available for purchase that alone could not have put others in danger,” according to U.S. officials, the Washington Examiner, however, reported.

In the airlift, the U.S. military has reportedly evacuated approximately 125,000 persons from Afghanistan, but only a far lesser percentage of those are apparently American citizens, green card holders, and/or those who actually worked with U.S. forces as translators and their families.

President Biden’s Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas has described the vetting of Afghan refugees as robust and including biometric screening and other metrics.

Secretary of State Antony Blinken has said that vetting is occurring, however, “on the back end,” after refugees arrive in America.

Many GOP lawmakers and others have raised fundamental questions about the thoroughness of the vetting process.

“It is a national security issue, and when I see that, previously, there was a 14-step process that had been established that took anywhere from 18 to 24 months in order to clear these individuals. I don’t see how in the world we can take well over 100,000 people now, and all of a sudden wave a magic wand and condense that vetting period and process into a couple of weeks’ time,” U.S. Rep. Matt Rosendale (R-Mont.) previously told the Examiner.

While previously acknowledging that many, if not most, of the refugees are good people, Fox News host Tucker Carlson opined about the influx during a recent broadcast, saying “the truth is, despite what [U.S. officials are] telling you, we have no real idea who they are. We just don’t know.” He also noted that at least 100 of the refugees have reportedly been flagged for potential terrorist ties.

Parenthetically, the interior minister (roughly equivalent to the U.S. DHS secretary) in the Taliban-controlled regime in Afghanistan is an accused terrorist on the FBI’s most-wanted list.

Biden is asking Congress for $6.4 billion in taxpayer funds to pay for the resettlement of about 100,000 Afghan refugees in America.

The Biden administration has also thrown open the U.S-Mexico border, allowing massive numbers of illegal aliens to pour into the country, most of whom are caught and released (other than those who evade Border Patrol detection in the first place). That crisis shows little sign of abating.

Robert Jonathan

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