Twitter decides: Orange man bad, Taliban still good

“Everybody’s got a Taliban.” So said the slovenly Michael Moore yesterday, on a day that saw every anti-American hack with a blue check compare the murderous regime to, wait for it, the Jan 6th insurrectionists. Well, the peevish documentarian of ill-fame may be right. If America has its own Taliban, its name is Twitter, and its leader is the Rasputin-doppelganger Jack Dorsey.

Dorsey and his ministry of truth have not followed the lead of their fellow social media giants, preferring instead to maintain their contrarian practices. Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram have all banned Taliban spokesmen from their platforms, but not Twitter. The Taliban are allowed to roam freely there, at least for now.

Propaganda from the Taliban, it seems, is more in line with their supposed values than anyone with a competing thought. It’s certainly more preferable than allowing the former POTUS, Donald. J. Trump, any avenue of communication whatsoever.

The well-deserved backlash was expected, but likely to fall on the deaf ears that live under Dorsey’s preferred summer accessory: the functional-yet-elegant black toboggan.

Twitter said in a statement that it will “continue to proactively enforce our rules and review content that may violate Twitter rules, specifically policies against glorification of violence, platform manipulation and spam.” But censorship is alive and well in America, so those “rules” are ever-changing. In any case, it is the same reasoning they used to ban former President Trump, but Twitter has defended its decision to allow Taliban-related accounts on the platform, saying that people in Afghanistan are using it to seek help and refuge.

Two Taliban spokesmen, Suhail Shaheen and Zabihullah Mujahid have more than 351,000 and 310,000 Twitter followers, respectively. Their accounts have been active for years.

The ongoing insanity prompted Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-CO) to pen a letter to Dorsey and Twitter on Tuesday, expressing his concern over the matter:

“Why does Twitter allow two Taliban spokesmen to have a platform but restricts the First Amendment Rights of former President Trump? It’s past time to hold #BigTech accountable. #Taliban,” he tweeted.

In his letter, Lamborn made the assertion that the Taliban falls under the ‘violent organization category.’

“In my review of these accounts, I did not find a single fact check on any of their tweets, nor any warnings for false or misleading content,” Lamborn wrote.

‘These propaganda updates usually assert that the overthrow has been largely peaceful, despite reports to the contrary … It is impossible to see how the accounts of Zabihullah Mujahid and Yousef Ahmandi do not violate your policies.”

Others were quick to line up:

‘Why on God’s green Earth does the Taliban spokesman have an active Twitter account but not the former President of the United States?’ asked Rep. Madison Cawthorn (R-NC).

‘Who’s side is the AMERICA BASED Big-Tech companies on?’ he added.

It wasn’t just the GOP though, other social media users got in on the act:

Earlier this year, Dorsey and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared before Congress, where questions of censorship were the focus as committee members attempted to rake the two billionaires over the coals to no avail.

Frank Webster

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