‘Game on’: Mom sued by teachers union after asking too many questions on CRT, demanding curriculum

The battle playing out across the nation over the teaching of critical race theory (CRT) in lower schools isn’t going away. Emerging heroes of the conservative movement against leftism are necessarily more outspoken than ever in defense of their children.

Nicole Solas, a Rhode Island mother of two, appeared on “Fox & Friends” on Thursday, expressing to co-host Ainsley Earhardt the need for parents to rise against the indoctrination of their kids.

“The more parents that ask more questions, the harder it will be for schools to retaliate against a lot of parents,” she asserted.

Upon enrolling one of her daughters in school, she innocuously asked for some information about their curriculum. Did the school teach any gender theory or anti-racism? She was told by the principal that the school had a common practice of not referring to the children as boys and girls and that, in fact, they never use any gender-based terminology.

Referring to anti-racism, Solas was told that kids in kindergarten are asked “What could have been done differently at Thanksgiving?” by their teachers. The odd query, directed at such young and impressionable youths, struck Solas as a thinly-veiled method of shaming her and others’ children for their American heritage.

Solas said that as she asked more questions, the school became increasingly evasive and she wasn’t getting clear, let alone substantive answers.

She summarily demanded, “Let me see the curriculum.”

And there the run-around began.


(Video: Fox News)

She was still being denied access to view the curriculum her children would be subjected to, and to date, her simple request for an in-person tour of the school has been ignored and dismissed. She was told by an unspecified school committee that she ought to submit a public information request, specifically an APRA, or Access to Public Records Act request.

Solas was able to submit her requests through the school district’s website, and a requester can be as specific as they wish for the documents they want to see. Surprisingly, the government-designed website (no doubt built at an obscene cost to the taxpayer) actually worked for her. She was finally able to see the curriculum in question.

But, upon inspection of the documents, she curiously found no evidence of gender theory or anti-racism teachings. But, Solas said, “I knew that they were still teaching it in schools.”

Realizing she could use the APRA system to answer other questions she had, Solas embarked on a quest for more and more detailed information. As of June 2 of this year, she has filed more than 200 requests. So far, the school board has been complying with the statutory timelines required of them to respond to each request, but it seems that now Nicole Solas has become a thorn in their side.

The solution? They are suing her.

“We are asking the Court to conduct a balancing test to determine whether our members’ privacy rights outweigh the public interest,” said Jennifer Azevedo, who serves as deputy director of the National Education Association Rhode Island (NEARI). “We believe they do, and those records should either not be disclosed or should be redacted accordingly.”

Their complaint continued: “Given the circumstances of the requests, it is likely that any teachers who are identifiable and have engaged in discussions about things like critical race theory will then be the subject of teacher harassment by national conservative groups opposed to critical race theory.”

A filing dated Thursday names Solas and the school district as co-defendants.

Solas fired back, telling Fox News, “You cannot be employed by the state and also demand immunity from public scrutiny. That’s not how open government works in America. Academic transparency is not a collective bargaining negotiation. It’s a parental right.”

The National Education Association retaliated with their own resolution, declaring they would “research the organizations attacking educators doing anti-racist work and/or use the research already done and put together a list of resources and recommendations for state affiliates, locals, and individual educators to utilize when they are attacked.”

Frank Webster

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