Judge unloads on autistic Jan. 6 defendant who refuses mask: ‘You don’t make the rules…You will be arrested!’

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A federal judge erupted at a reportedly autistic Jan. 6th rioter during a virtual hearing Friday after the suspected rioter, Daniel Goodwyn, told him he can’t wear a mask because “it stresses me out.”

Goodwyn was originally arrested in January and then released in February but has since repeatedly violated the conditions of his release “by refusing to wear a mask and failing to show up to meetings or report his location,” according to The Washington Post.

In response, prosecutors requested an emergency hearing for Friday to push for him to be jailed again until trial.

During the hearing, his attorney, John Hull, argued “that [he] had been diagnosed by a counselor as on the autism spectrum, which made it hard for him to wear a face covering and to handle rules he finds arbitrary. Some autistic people can’t tolerate face masks because of sensitivity to touch and texture,” according to the Post.

But when pressed about this by Walton, who was appointed to the court by then-President George W. Bush in 2001, Goodwyn said only that wearing a mask “stresses me out” and argued that he doesn’t believe in either the efficacy of masks or asymptomatic spread.

“I believe I would not cause someone to die by not wearing a mask,” he said, according to the Post.

This triggered Walton into his first explosion.

“When did you go to medical school?” he angrily asked.

Goodwyn admitted that he hadn’t but claimed he’d obtained the information from people who had.

“I don’t believe that, frankly,” the judge replied.

“There have been over 600,000 people who have died as a result of coming into contact with this virus, so I don’t care if you believe it or not,” he reportedly added.

Out of respect for Goodwyn’s autism, Walton chose not to seek his arrest at the time but warned that he’d have no other choice were he to continue acting up and not wearing a mask.

“If you can’t do that I’m going to have no alternative [but] to lock you up and keep you locked up until this case is resolved. They don’t have to put their lives at risk, they don’t have to, and they will not,” he said.

In turn, Goodwyn warned him that he won’t comply.

“I understand; I’m not going to do that, sir,” he said, reportedly adding that Texas law doesn’t require indoor masking.

This angered Walton again.

“I don’t care what the law in Texas is. You don’t make the rules. You will be arrested,” he said.

According to D.C. station WUSA, Goodwyn is a “Texas Proud Boy,” which explains his decision to cite Texas law.

As for his dislike for masks, it’s been endemic to his behavior since the day he was arrested on Jan. 29th.

At the time, FBI agents were reportedly told that at least one member of his household had tested positive for the coronavirus. Despite this bombshell, Goodwyn reportedly refused to specify his own status, take a coronavirus test or wear a mask.

“When FBI placed a mask on the defendant’s face after his arrest, the defendant attempted to chew through the mask and spit the mask out,” the Department of Justice wrote at the time, according to WUSA.

“During the defendant’s arrest, FBI used approximately five masks on the defendant. FBI then drove the defendant to a facility approximately 90 minutes from his residence that was willing to quarantine him,” the DOJ added.

Given Goodwyn’s near-phobia of masks, it appears, for all intents and purposes, that he’s most likely headed to jail sooner rather than later.

Ironically, his lawyer may be as well. According to the Post, Walton warned Hull that he could be held in contempt of court if he too keeps acting up.

Apparently, he kept interrupting the hearing Friday, and he had previously accused the court’s pretrial services officer of being “prissy” and “arrogant” in an email.

If both men do wind up locked up, it’s unclear whether they’ll perhaps be forced to share a cell …

Vivek Saxena

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