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CBS warns viewers words like ‘patriot’ and ‘thin blue line’ are secret extremist hate speech

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CBS reporter Dan Patterson warned viewers that they should be on the lookout for online groups that use the word “patriot” and the phrase “thin blue line” because they are, in reality, keywords for “QAnon” extremist hate groups.

“So, the new rule of QAnon is that there is no QAnon, at least not anymore. There was a QAnon. But after the mysterious poster named ‘Q’ told them to drop the branding because it became toxic last fall, QAnon true believers started to move on and after the Jan. 6 insurrection, most really dropped the QAnon branding,” Patterson noted. “Why? Because the conspiracies continued to metastasize on social media. Even in places like Facebook which require a real name, QAnon conspiracies have flourished since Jan. 6. Now, that’s just one example of in real life (IRL) QAnon true believer behavior. In the past year, especially just in the past 6 months, of course, they helped ferment the Jan. 6 insurrection, but they’ve also pushed the ‘big lie’ narrative across social media.”

He went on to accuse these so-called extremists of being anti-vaxxers and of having questioned the voting results in Maricopa County, Arizona. He also said they attend “patriot” rallies. Patterson says they are planning conferences and events this fall and connected QAnon to anyone who refers to the “deep state,” “patriot,” or “thin blue line.” Democrats have disingenuously promoted the group as a driving force in right-wing politics while trying to connect anyone disagreeing with them to QAnon.

“Although the brand they’ve decided to abandon [QAnon], they sure use a lot of the same language including the deep state. One word to look out for, a keyword, is ‘patriot.’ They also have co-opted a number of other brands including the ‘thin blue line’ brand, which they have just wrapped around conspiracy theories,” Patterson charged.

(Video Credit: CBS News)

“Euphemisms are really the way these groups talked prior to the insurrection. When mainstream media, like us, started following and catching on they realized that they had to change their language,” he claimed.

“This is, in many ways if you’re accustomed to following politics you know about how effective dog whistles can be, they are able to speak publicly and it doesn’t sound like your saying anything offensive. But your true believers, your followers can hear that dog whistle. That’s exactly what’s happening with QAnon true believers right now,” Patterson contended.

Patterson took his cue from Media Matters which is now claiming that over 40 QAnon candidates will be running for office in 2022. The claim appears to be a new salvo on the left attempting to smear Republican candidates running for office in the midterms. The media outlet is claiming that some QAnon supporters have been tied to violent incidents and took part in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. They are also claiming that “multiple government agencies have issued internal warnings of domestic terrorism regarding supporters of the conspiracy theory.”

The leftist site is tying 41 candidates to QAnon. “Nine are from Florida, eight are from California, four are from Texas, two each are from Arizona, Nevada, New Jersey, Illinois, New York, and Ohio, and there is one each from Maryland, Rhode Island, Oregon, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Georgia, and Colorado,” the site claims. Thirty-eight of the candidates are Republican and three are Independent.

The CBS interview where Patterson made his allegations warned that QAnon members are now running for school boards as well. This appears to be an attack against parents who are standing up against Critical Race Theory across the country. Many of them have vowed to run for school board seats.

CBS is asserting that QAnon has morphed and this is a new stage in their evolution. Patterson warned that they are “in your town, in your community, and in your school.”

Patterson was shredded on Twitter:

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