Obama attacks ‘right-wing media venues’ for ‘stoking fear and resentment’ among white people

Talk about audacity, former President Barack Obama is blaming “certain right-wing media venues” for stoking the fears of white Americans for financial gain.

This coming from the man who ushered in an age when openly discriminating against white people in the name of equity is all the rage, to the point where no one bats an eye when the black mayor of Chicago refuses to let white reporters interview her, or a New York City-based psychiatrist voices a violent fantasy of shooting white people in the head.

In a wide-ranging interview with CNN’s Anderson Cooper that will do little to repair the media’s tarnished reputation for corrupt bias, Obama said that he “tried” to tell the story of race in America as president.

Even here, Obama blames white people and his political opponents: see Republicans.

“Each and every time I tried to describe why it is that we are still not fully reconciled with our history,” he said. “But the fact is that it’s a hard thing to hear. It’s hard for the majority, in this country, white Americans, to recognize that, look, you — you can be proud of this country and its traditions and its history. And our forefathers. And yet, it is also true that this terrible stuff happened. And that, you know, the vestiges of that linger, and continue.”

(Video: CNN)

Obama referenced the incident involving Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr., when a belligerent Gates was arrested after Cambridge police approached him after getting a call that he was trying to force his way into what would prove to be his own home. This prompting the infamous remark from Obama that police acted “stupidly,” despite acknowledging that he did not know the facts.

“Not only did that cause a firestorm, but subsequent polling showed that my support among white voters dropped more precipitously after what — what should have been a minor, trivial incident — than anything else during my presidency,” he said, with a chuckle of sorts.

The former president went on to cleverly lay out one of the key tenets of critical race theory — that America is an inherently racist nation — when he said “these things are still — you know, they’re deep in us. And, you know, sometimes… unconscious.”

It was at this point that Obama zeroed in on conservative media, which is currently engaged in a battle for survival with Big Tech.

“I also think that there are certain right-wing media venues, for example, that monetize and capitalize on stoking the fear and resentment of a white population that is witnessing a changing America and seeing demographic changes, and do everything they can to give people a sense that their way of life is threatened and that people are trying to take advantage of them,” Obama said.

It’s fair to suggest the white man seen lying unconscious in a Minneapolis street over the weekend, bleeding heavily, was feeling threatened.

Obama’s comment reeks of his slam on white working-class voters in the run-up to the 2008 election, the infamous “bitter clingers” remark.

“It’s not surprising then that they get bitter, they cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren’t like them or anti-immigrant sentiment or anti-trade sentiment as a way to explain their frustrations,” he said in April 2008, speaking of Midwest voters.

The nation’s first black president, who many would argue set race relations in America back a half-century or more, tried to downplay the significance of critical race theory, a toxic belief steeped in Marxism that is being pushed on the country today, to the point where even much of corporate America is now on board.

“You would think, with all the public-policy debates that are taking place right now, that, you know, the Republican Party would be engaged in a significant debate about how are we going to deal with the economy? And what are we going to do about climate change? And what are we going to do about — lo and behold, the single-most important issue to them, apparently, right now, is critical-race theory,” he said. “Who knew that was the threat to our republic. But those debates are powerful, because they get at what story do we tell about ourselves?”

The racial animosity being driven by the left today is part of a longstanding strategy to rip the bandage off a perceived problem and expose the gaping wound, under the guise of allowing for the healing of said wound.

And let’s not forget that the current anti-police attitude on the left can be traced back to the Gates incident, and that Obama played a significant role in making the death of Trayvon Martin, at the hands of a Hispanic neighborhood-watch volunteer, a racial issue when he declared “this could have been my son.”

When a Ferguson police officer was forced to defend his life against a charging 18-year-old Michael Brown, who had already violently attacked the cop, resulting in the teen’s death, Obama addressed the nation to call his death “heartbreaking,” and sent his “deepest condolences to his family and his community at this very difficult time.”

He would also urge the country to “remember this young man through reflection and understanding.”

And we wonder why police are demonized today? Cause and effect.

Tom Tillison

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