Alec Baldwin finally says something sane: ‘Cancel culture’ is ‘forest fire in constant need of fuel’

Actor and “Saturday Night Live” alum Alec Baldwin, who rose to fame on the venerable late-night music-and-comedy sketch show doing impressions of former President Donald Trump, became the latest entertainment liberal to speak out against so-called ‘cancel culture,’ which has been embraced largely by the far left.

“Cancel culture is like a forest fire in constant need of fuel. Functioning objectively. No prejudice. No code. Just destroy. The deserving and the undeserving alike,” Baldwin noted in a Friday tweet.

Baldwin’s cancel culture warning came a day after he also took to social media to complain about the media’s coverage of his wife’s inconsistent claims of Spanish heritage.

“There appears to be a zero tolerance policy for bad behavior everywhere except where it matters most: the US Congress,” Baldwin wrote.

In December, Baldwin posted a sometimes-rambling eight-plus minute video in which he also complained about the “anonymity” offered by social media.

“We live in a world now where we’re hidden behind the anonymity of social media. People feel that they can say anything,” he said. “No profile picture very often — sometimes yes — no identifying features there, hidden behind the anonymity of social media, they want to just shoot it all over you and spray it all over you, their venom and their hate.”

Earlier that month, his wife, Hilaria Baldwin, 37, was forced to admit that she lied about her heritage. Initially claiming she was born on the Spanish island of Mallorca before moving to Boston when she was 19 to attend school, she said in an Instagram video that actually she was born in Boston.

“There’s been some questions about where I’m born, I’m born in Boston,” she said. “I spent some of my childhood in Boston, some of my childhood in Spain, my family, my brother, my parents, my nephew, everybody is over there in Spain now, I’m here.”

She then went on to comment about her varying Spanish accent, which at times was lost as she spoke.

“I am that person, if I’ve been speaking a lot of Spanish, I tend to mix them or if I’m speaking a lot of English, I mix that,” she said. “It’s one of those things I have always been a bit insecure about.”

“It’s not something I’m playing at,” she added. “I want that to be very, very clear.”

She then explained why she used the name Hilaria instead of Hillary to come clean about her ethnicity.

“Yes, I am a white girl,” she said.

“Europe has a lot of white people in there. My family is white,” she added. “Ethnically, I am a mix of many many many things. Culturally, I grew up with two cultures. So it’s really as simple as that.”

For his part, husband Alec, a star of “30 Rock,” posted — then deleted — a 14-minute video on Instagram in which he also appeared to lash out at cancel culture, the Daily Mail reported.

“I do have a few people going at me for defending people who have been accused of crimes… Well, I’m not defending someone who is guilty of something. I’m choosing to defend someone who has not been proven guilty of something,” he said in the video, apparently referring to actor/director Woody Allen and New York Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Later, he posted another shorter video in which he appeared to be sitting in his home in near-darkness.

“I think my last message went on too long. What I was saying is I think that the cancel culture is getting out of hand. There are people who deserved to be punished for what they have done, but not everyone should be punished in the same way,” he said.

 

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Jon Dougherty

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