‘Police kill people’ cop-hate permeates Oscars: ‘I may have traded in my heels for marching boots’

The 93rd Academy Awards was on Sunday evening and it didn’t take long for the verdict of Derek Chauvin’s trial to come up, with actress Regina King hitting on it in her opening remarks — she strode to the lectern in “full power-walk mode,” as TMZ described it, before almost tripping and face-planting on live TV.

“It has been quite a year, and we are still smack dab in the middle of it,” she opened. “We are mourning the loss of so many… and I have to be honest, if things had gone differently this past week in Minneapolis, I may have traded in my heels for marching boots.”

“Now, I know a lot of you people at home want to reach for your remotes and you feel like Hollywood is preaching to you,” King continued. “But as a mother of a black son, I know the fear that so many live with, and no amount of fame or fortune changes that. Ok?”

The remark about people reaching for remotes suggesting that Tinsel Town is getting the message that millions of Americans reject the politicization of the entertainment industry — yet, King still pushed the false narrative of racist cops targeting black men, which is not supported by statistics.

“But tonight, we’re here to celebrate. This was indeed a hard year for everyone, but our love of movies helped to get us through,” King added. “It made us feel less isolated and connected us when we were apart.”

(Video: ABC)

Given the politically correct, woke slant of the content coming out of Hollywood these days, those feeling connected may lean to the left.

Director and producer Tyler Perry took on a more neutral tone with his acceptance speech, talking about how his mother inspired him to “refuse to hate.”

“My mother taught me to refuse hate. She taught me to refuse blanket judgment,” he said. “And in this time, with all of the internet and social media and algorithms and everything that wants us to think a certain way, the 24-hour news cycle, it is my hope that all of us would teach our kids, and I want to remember: just refuse hate. Don’t hate anybody.”

“I refuse to hate someone because they are Mexican or because they are black or white. Or LBGTQ. I refuse to hate someone because they are a police officer. I refuse to hate someone because they are Asian. I would hope we would refuse hate,” he said.

As for the anti-cop take, Travon Free, co-director of the film “Two Distant Strangers” poured it on during his acceptance speech — the film is about a black man stuck in a time loop where he ends up getting shot by a white police officer over and over again, and won an Oscar for best live-action short.

If viewers were going to reach for their remotes, the propaganda Free was spewing would have done the trick.

“Today, the police will kill 3 people. And tomorrow, the police will kill 3 people. And the day after that, the police will kill 3 people,” Free stated. “Because, on average, the police in America, every day kill 3 people which amounts to about 1000 people a year. And those people happen to be disproportionately black people.”

“You know, James Baldwin once said, ‘The most despicable thing a person can be is indifferent to other people’s pain.’ So I just ask that you please not be indifferent,” he continued. “Please don’t be indifferent to our pain.”

The statement offers no context, nor does it take into account criminal activity and who’s committing it. Instead, Free demonized the men and women of law enforcement who risk their lives every day to ensure that the rest of us can go about the business of living our lives.

And while it will be interesting to see the ratings for Sunday night’s broadcast, social media users weren’t tuning in or buying what a bunch of wealthy Hollywood elitists were selling.

Here’s a quick sampling of responses from Twitter:

Powered by Topple

Tom Tillison

Comments

Latest Articles