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BLM defends co-founder’s $1.4M mansion, calls reporting ‘tradition of terror by white supremacists’

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The Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation is claiming that the “right-wing offensive” reporting on avowed Marxist and Black Lives Matter co-founder, Patrisse Khan-Cullors’ purchase of a $1.4 million home “continues a tradition of terror by white supremacists against Black activists.”

Cullors just recently purchased the luxury compound in Topanga Canyon, California near Malibu, and has been widely criticized by both leftists and conservatives for the move.

She reportedly bought four high-priced homes, spending in excess of $3.2 million. Some are located in wealthy predominately white neighborhoods. She has also allegedly been considering property in the Bahamas at a pricy beachfront resort outside of Nassau. Condos in that development are priced between $5 million to $20 million.

According to Black Enterprise: “During the height of the 2020 BLM movement, Khan-Cullors and spouse Janaya Khan purchased a “custom ranch” on 3.2 rural acres in Conyers, Georgia. Additionally, the activist is said to have paid $510,000 for a three-bedroom home in Inglewood, California, and $590,000 for a four-bedroom home in South LA that she purchased in 2018.”

(Video Credit: Fox News)

The Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation released an accusatory statement defending its co-founder and decrying what they are calling a “false and dangerous story.” The group asserted that Cullors serves in a volunteer capacity as executive director.

“Patrisse’s work for Black people over the years has made her and others who align with the fight for Black liberation targets of racist violence,” the foundation’s statement reads.

“The narratives being spread about Patrisse have been generated by right-wing forces intent on reducing the support and influence of a movement that is larger than any one organization,” it continued. “This right-wing offensive not only puts Patrisse, her child, and her loved ones in harm’s way, it also continues a tradition of terror by white supremacists against Black activists.”

“All Black activists know the fear these malicious and serious actions are meant to instill: the fear of being silenced, the trauma of being targeted, the torture of feeling one’s family is exposed to danger just for speaking out against unjust systems,” the statement added.

“We have seen this tactic of terror time and again, but our movement will not be silenced,” it concludes. But nowhere in the rebuff to allegations leveled at Cullors does the foundation address her actual spending.

Hawk Newsome, the head of Black Lives Matter Greater New York City, is calling for “an independent investigation” to determine how the foundation is spending its money following Cullors’ purchases.

“If you go around calling yourself a socialist, you have to ask how much of her own personal money is going to charitable causes,” he remarked. “It’s really sad because it makes people doubt the validity of the movement and overlook the fact that it’s the people that carry this movement.”

InfluenceWatch noted that the foundation raised approximately $90 million in 2020, and spent $8.4 million on operating expenses. $21.7 million was given out in grants. They reportedly spent another $2 million on voter advocacy programs, which left the foundation with approximately $60 million on the books going into 2021.

The Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation also said in the statement: “To be abundantly clear, as a registered 501c3, BLMGNF cannot and did not commit any organizational resources toward the purchase of personal property by any employee or volunteer. Any insinuation or assertion to the contrary is categorically false.”

Twitter has stepped into the fray as well. Black sports journalist Jason Whitlock claimed that Twitter blocked him over a tweet criticizing Cullors for buying her high-end home in a mostly white neighborhood. Twitter claimed his post “violated the Twitter Rules.”

“BLM is one of Big Tech’s sacred cows,” Whitlock told the Daily Mail. “I think Twitter has been looking for an excuse to de-platform me.”

Commenters on Twitter sounded off over the matter:

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