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Dr. Birx’ dubious attempt to blame Trump for most Covid deaths backfires when left turns on her

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An attempt by former Trump administration official Dr. Deborah Birx, a career bureaucrat, to essentially throw former President Donald Trump under the bus in hopes of perhaps scoring some points with the left backfired spectacularly.

Instead of being heralded as a hero by the anti-Trump “resistance,” she wound up becoming a target of its unquenchable rage.

Last week CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta spoke with both Birx and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci for a special set to air Sunday.

On Saturday, CNN previewed the special with a clip, and in that clip, Birx, who’d served as a lead member of the Trump administration’s coronavirus task force, suggested that fewer people would have died from the virus had it not been for Trump’s policies.

I look at it this way. The first time we have an excuse — there were about 100,000 deaths that came from that original surge. All of the rest of them, in my mind, could have been mitigated or decreased substantially,” she said.

Watch the full clip below:

 

While one might reasonably expect Birx’s remarks to have provoked praise from virulently anti-Trump leftists, they actually triggered anger.

But it wasn’t that critics disagreed with the unproven thesis that fewer people would have died had the pandemic been dealt with differently. Rather, to hear them tell it, because Birx herself had played such a pivotal role in the Trump administration’s coronavirus efforts, she was as much to blame as her former boss.

Like far-left California Rep. Ted Lieu noted, “The malicious incompetence that resulted in hundreds of thousands of unnecessary deaths starts at the top, with the former President and his enablers. And who was one of his enablers? Dr. Birx, who was afraid to challenge his unscientific rhetoric and wrongfully praised him.”

Look (*Language warning):

This isn’t to say that Birx’s thesis is correct.

As of late March, over 550,000 Americans had died from the virus, making the United States the hardest hit country on a raw number basis.

However, on a per capita basis, only 1,690.61 Americans had died per every million residents, placing the U.S. significantly lower than countries like Czechia where the per capital rate had eclipsed 2,400.

Moreover, thanks to the Trump administration’s willingness to do and spend anything to develop and distribute a vaccine, the United States was outperforming large chunks of the world, including nearly all of Europe.

“The Trump administration’s Operation Warp Speed didn’t worry about the cost of the vaccines or whether the vaccine companies could be held liable for side effects. The Europeans focused on trying to get a low price for the vaccines, and on making sure the  vaccine companies could be sued if the vaccines caused problems,” according to The Atlantic.

“The U.S. threw money at the problem, flooding vaccine makers with billions of dollars in subsidies to increase the speed of vaccine testing and manufacturing. Unlike the EU, the U.S. and the U.K. bought millions of doses of various vaccine candidates last summer, without knowing which ones would be effective.”

Months later, much of Europe was still under strict lockdown restrictions as the virus continued to rage, whereas in the United States life was finally returning to normal.

Had current President Joe Biden been in charge at the onset of the outbreak, the entire country would have likely been locked down for months on end.

Yet a year later, some of the best performing U.S. states were red ones like Florida that chose to abstain from locking down in accordance with Trump’s now-vindicated belief that the “cure” mustn’t “be worse than the problem.”

Vivek Saxena

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