Biden opts to focus on ‘vicious’ hate crimes against Asian-Americans in first big primetime speech

As President Joe Biden addressed the nation Thursday evening, marking the one year anniversary of the pandemic-induced shutdown — he opened with a falsehood, saying we “were hit with a virus that was met with silence, and spread unchecked, denials for days, weeks, then months.”

In the first primetime address of his presidency, Biden may have used the occasion to take a veiled shot at his predecessor, but his speech comes against the backdrop of the president having now gone longer than his last 15 predecessors in holding a solo press conference. And there’s no word yet on a State of the Union address.

While much has happened in his first seven weeks in office, one of the topics Biden chose to address Thursday night was hate crimes against Asian-Americans, which he called “wrong” and “un-American.”

“We are fundamentally a people who want to be with others, to talk, to laugh, to hug, to hold one another, but this virus has kept us apart,” Biden said, spewing empathy. “Grandparents haven’t seen their children or grandchildren. Parents haven’t seen their kids. Kids haven’t seen their friends.”

(Source: Fox News)

“The things we used to do that always filled us with joy have become things we couldn’t do and broke our hearts,” he continued. “Too often we’ve turned against one another. A mask, the easiest thing to do to save lives. Sometimes it divides us. States pitted against one another instead of working with each other. Vicious hate crimes against Asian-Americans, who’ve been attacked, harassed, blamed, and scapegoated.”

The New York Times recently reported that attacks on Asian-Americans “soared in New York City last year” — naturally, the newspaper blamed former President Donald Trump.

“Asian-Americans are grappling with the anxiety, fear and anger brought on by the attacks, which activists and elected officials say were fueled early in the pandemic by former President Donald J. Trump, who frequently used racist language to refer to the coronavirus,” the Times stated.

COVID-19 was often referred to by Trump as the “Chinese virus,” based on the belief held by many that the coronavirus originated in a Wuhan laboratory — the World Health Organization said that’s unlikely, for whatever that’s worth.

Biden claimed that Asian-Americans are afraid of being killed just for walking down the street.

“At this very moment, so many of them are fellow Americans. They’re on the front lines of this pandemic trying to save lives and still they are forced to live in fear for their lives just walking down streets in America,” Biden said. “It’s wrong, it’s un-American and it must stop.”

He then put forth a hearty sell on the virtues of big government.

“Look, we know what we need to do to beat this virus,” the president said. “Tell the truth, follow the scientists and the science. Work together, put trust and faith in our government to fulfill its most important function, which is protecting the American people, no function more important. We need to remember the government isn’t some foreign force in a distant capital. No, it’s us, all of us, we the people.”

Since taking office, Biden has signed over 50 executive actions, an unprecedented pace not seen before, has bombed Syria and faces an exploding illegal immigration crisis on the southern border. And then there are the steadily rising gas prices.

But none of that made Thursday’s night’s speech. And who knows how much longer Biden will hold off on holding a press conference.

As friendly as ABC News is to a Democratic president, even they are complaining that it now been 50 days, even holding up Trump as a benchmark.

“Halfway into his first 100 days, President Joe Biden has yet to hold a formal, solo news conference, raising questions about accountability with the White House under increasing pressure to explain why,” ABC News reported Thursday. “The contrast with former President Donald Trump has been especially striking, especially given Biden’s repeated promises to Americans that he’d always be ‘straight’ and ‘transparent.'”

Tom Tillison

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