Powered by Topple

Popular Netflix show ‘Cobra Kai’ is under scrutiny now for ‘its whiteness’

Powered by Topple

Get the latest BPR news delivered free to your inbox daily. SIGN UP HERE


CHECK OUT WeThePeople.store for best SWAG!

The Los Angeles Times is under fire from everyday people — not the “woke” — for publishing a glaringly racist piece complaining about the “whiteness” of a Netflix TV show.

Contemplate for a moment how the world would react if a conservative outlet complained about a show’s “blackness,” and it quickly becomes evident why so many people — though not the “woke” — find the piece distressing.



In the piece written by film reporter Jen Yamato, she specifically talks about the Netflix show “Cobra Kai,” which is based on “Karate Kid,” an 80s film about a white teenage bullying victim, Danny LaRusso, being trained by a proficient karate master on how to fight back.

Yamato admits that the show enjoys “likable characters, high-energy fights, suburban melodrama and ’80s dad-rock,” but laments that the majority of the main characters are “white men.” Never mind that one of the main characters is a Latino man, and the other a white female.

“Across the industry, the [UCLA’s annual Hollywood Diversity Report] found that white characters made up 75.9% of the leads in digital scripted series like ‘Cobra Kai’ in the 2018-2019 season, while 5.9% of leads were Latinx, 4.7% were Black and just 1.8% were Asian,” Yamato writes.

Latinx is a made-up word used primarily by white liberals to virtue-signal their “wokeness.”

Yamato then cites several examples of “woke” film critics complaining about the show’s “whiteness.”

“A number of critics have taken notice of the series’ whiteness as well: Salon culture senior editor Hanh Nguyen, who has been critical of the series in the past, told The Times that ‘the only main character of color who has any sort of interiority is Miguel.’ ‘Danny LaRusso, Italian kid from Jersey,’ as Vanity Fair’s Sonia Saraiya put it about the first two seasons, ‘is the most Japanese character on this show,'” she continues.

“As Times TV critic Lorraine Ali writes, ‘Cobra Kai’ has successfully mined laughs and pathos from Johnny’s transformation through his proximity to an immigrant family. It’s also scrutinized how Kreese’s brand of karate perpetuates a cycle of militant toxic masculinity. But it has been slow to explore Daniel’s own blind spots beyond a moment of clueless ‘sushi-splaining’ and his bewilderment that his karate-chopping commercials might be seen as cultural appropriation.”

Take note of the “woke” buzzwords, all of them aimed at denigrating white males.

As noted earlier, the piece provoked backlash — but only from the non-woke.

Look:

The “woke” see no problem with the piece because they think it’s perfectly acceptable to disparage white people. It’s all part of the backwards critical race theory and identity politics-based ideology to which they subscribe.

The thinking is that, because white people oppressed others in the annals of history, it’s perfectly fine to oppress them now. As well-known critical race theorist Ibram X. Kendi often argues, the only true cure for racism is more racism.

“The only remedy to racist discrimination is antiracist discrimination,” Kendi writes in his book, “How To be An Antiracist.” “The only remedy to past discrimination is present discrimination. The only remedy to present discrimination is future discrimination.”

It’s a horrifying notion made more horrifying still by the fact that it’s been adopted by multiple institutions, including, it would appear, the institution of journalism.

Vivek Saxena

Comments

Latest Articles