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Proposed NY bill to detain ‘disease carriers’ on governor’s order if he deems dangerous to public

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A New York State lawmaker has proposed a dangerously authoritarian bill that would vest Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his top health officials with the unilateral power to order the “detention” of anyone suspected of having or being exposed to the coronavirus.

Introduced by New York Assemblyman N. Nick Perry, who reportedly also serves as the chair of the NYS Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus, Bill A416 would drastically expand the state government’s power.

The bill specifically states that if, “in the opinion of the governor,” there’s “clear and convincing evidence that the health of others is or may be endangered by a … suspected case, contact or carrier of a contagious disease,” the governor and “heads of local health departments” can detain the person or group of persons via “a single order.”

The apparent suspects will then “be detained in a medical facility or other appropriate facility or premises designated by the governor or his or her delegee.”

Only if and when the detention extends beyond three days must the governor or his “delegee” seek out a court for any sort of authorization — and only if the suspects explicitly request release (assuming they’re allowed to).

“When a person or group is ordered to be detained … for a period exceeding three business days, and such person or member of such group requests release, the governor or his or her delegee shall make an application for a court order authorizing such detention within three business days after such request,” the bill reads.

If a court doesn’t intervene, the apparent suspects will eventually have to be released within five days of requesting release. But if a court doesn’t intervene and the apparent suspects don’t request release, they can only be held for a total of 60 days.

If, on the other hand, a court does approve the detention, the governor doesn’t need to “seek further court review of such detention” for a total of 90 days.

Given court approval, the detention would continue indefinitely until the governor “[d]etermines, with the exercise of due diligence,” that the suspects are no longer contagious.

View the horrifying bill below:

Nick Perry Bill A416 New York by V Saxena on Scribd

Once detained, suspects can be forced to undergo medical examinations and accept a “prescribed course of treatment, preventive medication or vaccination.”

The bill doesn’t specifically mention the coronavirus, meaning it would be applicable to any contagious disease or condition that merits the governor’s attention.

Perry introduced near-verbatim bills during the 2015-2016 and 2017-2018 legislative sessions, but they failed to gain any traction. With the coronavirus pandemic now front and center, his chances this time around could be significantly higher.

The New York State Senate website shows that the latest bill is slated to be reviewed by the New York State Assembly Health Committee next Wednesday.

While there’s a chance the bill will be tossed aside again like in times past, its reemergence this year amid all the equally authoritarian measures that HAVE passed — think lockdowns, mask mandates, arrests, etc. — have the public worried.

Some may even likened the proposed detainment to “detention camps.”

Look:

To be fair, it’s unclear whether Cuomo is aware of and supports the bill.

See more backlash below:

Such fears would perhaps be unwarranted were there not so much evidence of political leaders — particularly Democrat ones — abusing their authority to ostensibly control the spread of the coronavirus.

From locking down businesses (while keeping their own open) to demanding their constituents remain at home (while themselves going out and about), left-wing political leaders have practically made the words “rules for thee but not for me” their mantra.

And so with so much Communist-styled authoritarianism and double standards already at play, the chances of Perry’s bill being signed into law seem higher than ideal in what should be a free, democratic country.

Vivek Saxena

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