At least 140 House Republicans plan to challenge Electoral College vote, report claims

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Two unnamed House Republicans told CNN this Thursday that at least 140 of their colleagues intend to challenge the results of the 2020 presidential election on Jan. 6th.

“Two Republican members of the House of Representatives tell CNN that they expect at least 140 of their GOP colleagues in the House to vote against counting the electoral votes on January 6 when Congress is expected to certify President-elect Joe Biden’s victory,” CNN revealed in a report written by none other than Jake Tapper.

Tapper spent the majority of the remainder of the piece ostensibly “debunking” House Republicans’ concerns, claiming that “[t]here have been no credible allegations of any issues with voting that would have impacted the election.”

He did however conclude the write-up with some actual reporting about the Republicans who’ve publicly announced their intention to object on Jan. 6th.

“Among the more than one dozen Republican House members who have already publicly said they’ll vote against counting the electoral votes next week are Reps. Mo Brooks of Alabama, who’s spearheading the effort, Jody Hice of Georgia, Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey and Joe Wilson of South Carolina,” he wrote.

“Included in that group are eight Republican lawmakers from Pennsylvania, who announced their intentions in a joint statement earlier Thursday. Several incoming Republican House members have also said they will object to the certification process, including Reps.-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, Madison Cawthorn of North Carolina, Lauren Boebert of Colorado and Diana Harshbarger of Tennessee.”

As to the rest of the 140 House Republicans, their identities remain unknown. And according to Sen. Ben Sasse, so does their existence.

In a Facebook post published Wednesday that went viral among leftists — though it didn’t earn him any brownie points — the senator claimed he isn’t aware of a single congressional Republican who genuinely questions the legitimacy of Democrat presidential nominee Joe Biden’s ostensible election victory.

“When we talk in private, I haven’t heard a single Congressional Republican allege that the election results were fraudulent – not one. Instead, I hear them talk about their worries about how they will ‘look’ to President Trump’s most ardent supporters,” he wrote.

The suggestion was that the public hubbub about election fraud is contrived, i.e., it’s a performance designed to appease the president and thus the GOP base.

Thursday evening on CNN’s “OutFront,” congressional correspondent Phil Mattingly seemed to conveniently confirm this narrative.

“And in that [Faceook] post, [Sasse] said explicitly, he has not spoken to a single Congressional Republican that does not know that Joe Biden is the President-elect of the United States. Now, I can’t speak for all, probably what, 230, 243 Republicans on Capitol Hill in the House and the Senate in terms of what they actually think,” he said.

“But the vast majority of them that I’ve spoken to acknowledge the reality at least privately and that is what’s caused so many problems right now inside the Senate Republican conference.”

Listen:

Earlier on Thursday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell held an “all-member” conference call, though it certainly wasn’t plagued by “many problems.” The only “problem” was that Sen. Josh Hawley didn’t attend, and this briefly caught McConnell off guard.

According to Alex Isenstadt of Politico, during the Thursday conference call McConnell brought up Hawley by name and began pressing him “to explain his plans to object to the Electoral College.”

In response, Hawley said nothing because — as McConnell would soon realize, much to his presumed embarrassment — the Missouri senator had skipped the call.

View Isenstadt’s report below:

However, immediately following the call, Hawley sent an email to his colleagues addressing the Senate majority leader’s concerns. As to why he’d skipped the call, he wrote only that “I was unable to join this morning’s call.”

“If you’ve been speaking to folks at home, I’m sure you know how deeply angry and disillusioned many, many people are – and how frustrated that Congress has taken no action. … I strongly believe there should be a full-fledged congressional investigation and also a slate of election integrity legislation,” the email continued.

“I intend to object during the certification process on January 6 in order to force these issues to the fore, and to point out the unprecedented failure of states like Pennsylvania to follow their own election laws and the unprecedented efforts of Big Tech corporations to interfere with the election.”

He concluded the email by pointing out that Democrats have also in times past challenged the results of an election.

“[O]ur Democrat colleagues have used the certification process in recent years to raise issues of election integrity. I strongly believe it is entirely appropriate for those of us concerned about the integrity of this last election to do the same,” he wrote.

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Vivek Saxena

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