Anne Hathaway apologizes for her fictional character being disabled after threats to boycott

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Left-wing Hollywood actress Anne Hathaway has bent the knee to a mob of “woke” critics who complained about one of the fictional characters she’d played

The witch whom Hathaway played in the HBO film “The Witches” has three fingers on each hand, and this is problematic to “woke” critics because it’s similar to the so-called split hand/split foot malformation, also known as ectrodactyly.

Ectrodactyly is a real-life condition that Hathaway doesn’t suffer from, and so her playing a fictional character who does suffer from the condition provoked outrage and dismay from “woke” people who seem to take offense to virtually anything.

Here’s a sample of the “woke” outrage below:

Note how all the critics appeared to be women

The backlash over Hathaway playing a fictional character with three fingers on each hand grew so severe that nearly 9,000 “woke” people signed a petition calling for “The Witches” to be boycotted. The petition was launched by a woman who doesn’t have ectrodactyly but who was offended on behalf of her son who does.

“Now I have crippling anxiety about what his peers who have seen this movie might say. Are kids going to point at him in public and call him a witch? How is his life going to be impacted by HBO’s decision to depict ectrodactyly the way it did in this movie,” she wrote.

Nowhere in the petition did she specify whether or not her son — the person who actually has ectrodactyly — was himself offended by the movie.

(Source: Change.org)

On Thursday, Hathaway responded to the controversy by issuing a full-throated apology for playing the role of a fictional character with three fingers on each hand.

“I have recently learned that many people with limb differences, especially children, are in pain because of the portrayal of the Grand High Witch in The Witches,” she wrote in a lengthy, remorseful Instagram post.

“Let me begin by saying I do my best to be sensitive to the feelings and experiences of others not out of some scrambling PC fear, but because not hurting others seems like a basic level of decency we should all be striving for,” she continued.

“As someone who really believes in inclusivity and really, really detests cruelty, I owe you all an apology for the pain caused. I am sorry. I did not connect limb difference with the GHW when the look of the character was brought to me; if I had, I assure you this never would have happened.”

She added that she was especially “sorry to kids with limb differences,” though to be clear, there’s no evidence that any child in America had taken the slightest offense to her playing the role of a fictional witch with three fingers on each hand.

“[N]ow that I know better I promise I’ll do better. And I owe a special apology to everyone who loves you as fiercely as I love my own kids: I’m sorry I let your family down,” she concluded.

Look at the post below:

 

View this post on Instagram

 

I have recently learned that many people with limb differences, especially children, are in pain because of the portrayal of the Grand High Witch in The Witches. Let me begin by saying I do my best to be sensitive to the feelings and experiences of others not out of some scrambling PC fear, but because not hurting others seems like a basic level of decency we should all be striving for. As someone who really believes in inclusivity and really, really detests cruelty, I owe you all an apology for the pain caused. I am sorry. I did not connect limb difference with the GHW when the look of the character was brought to me; if I had, I assure you this never would have happened. I particularly want to say I’m sorry to kids with limb differences: now that I know better I promise I’ll do better. And I owe a special apology to everyone who loves you as fiercely as I love my own kids: I’m sorry I let your family down. If you aren’t already familiar, please check out the @Lucky_Fin_Project (video above) and the #NotAWitch hashtag to get a more inclusive and necessary perspective on limb difference.

A post shared by Anne Hathaway (@annehathaway) on

A day later, Warner Brothers issued its own lengthy apology.

“We the filmmakers and Warner Bros. Pictures are deeply saddened to learn that our depiction of the fictional characters in The Witches could upset people with disabilities, and regret any offense caused,” a spokesperson reportedly told E! News.

“In adapting the original story, we worked with designers and artists to come up with a new interpretation of the cat-like claws that are described in the book. It was never the intention for viewers to feel that the fantastical, non-human creatures were meant to represent them. This film is about the power of kindness and friendship. It is our hope that families and children can enjoy the film and embrace this empowering, love-filled theme.”

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Vivek Saxena

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