New York Post celebrates after Twitter lifts suspension. What’s next, an apology or a lawsuit?

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The New York Post’s Twitter account has been unsuspended after what had been a two-week standoff over the social media network’s former “Hacked Materials Policy.”

In a series of tweets posted early Friday evening, Twitter’s official “Twitter Safety” account said it would stop punishing the Post for having violated its original policy, which was updated recently after backlash erupted over its censorship.

“Our policies are living documents. We’re willing to update and adjust them when we encounter new scenarios or receive important feedback from the public. One such example is the recent change to our Hacked Materials Policy and its impact on accounts like the New York Post,” the social media network wrote.

“In response, we’re updating our practice of not retroactively overturning prior enforcement. Decisions made under policies that are subsequently changed & published can now be appealed if the account at issue is a driver of that change. We believe this is fair and appropriate.”

In other words, the Post is now free to tweet again.

View the tweets below:

The standoff began when the Post, a 218-year-old news outlet, published six tweets on Oct. 14 that linked to a story containing bombshell allegations about Democrat presidential nominee Joe Biden and his youngest son, Hunter.

The allegations were based on emails, photos and videos found on a laptop that had allegedly been owned by Hunter. In response to pressure from the Democrat Party and its media allies, Twitter promptly suspended the New York Post’s account and began blocking all other users from linking to and sharing the Post’s reporting.

Twitter’s censorship of the Post’s reporting triggered massive cries of censorship from conservative critics and provoked congressional Republicans into subpoenaing Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to testify before the Senate Commerce Committee.

The backlash eventually led to Twitter relenting a day later by adjusting its “Hacked Materials Policy.” The social media network still maintained that the content shared by the Post was “hacked content” but decided it would “no longer remove hacked content unless it is directly shared by hackers or those acting in concert with them.”

Look:

However, Twitter refused to outright roll back the Post’s suspension. Instead, the network demanded that the paper abide by its original policy by voluntarily removing the tweets that had triggered its suspension in the first place.

This move triggered another round of recriminations, with critics describing the rationale behind Twitter’s decision as “half-cocked nonsense.”

Look:

Note how the critics also bashed the mainstream media for their glaring lack of interest not only in Twitter’s censorship of the free press, but also in the Post’s reporting, which has since been corroborated by multiple sources.

Perhaps the worst offenders were the “journalists” at CNN. Brian Stelter, who cries foul about “attacks on the media” whenever President Donald Trump says a single mean word about the press, was nowhere to be found.

Meanwhile, Jake Tapper was adamant that the proper solution to the crisis was for the Post to simply bend the knee and remove its original tweets, despite the outlet having done nothing wrong.

Though the crisis is now resolved, the anger hasn’t abated — neither toward Twitter over its censorship of legitimate reporting, nor toward the media for their tacit endorsement of censorship of reporting that doesn’t benefit their clear-cut ideological bent.

The lingering anger toward Twitter has been particularly visceral.

Look:

“Charges” as in criminal charges …

In related news, Twitter’s stock price plummeted by over 20 percent Friday morning after it posted a large slump in daily active users.

As for the Post, its feeling quite jolly:

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Vivek Saxena

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