Bill Hemmer plays ‘what if’ – breaks down the nail-biting potential 2020 electoral paths

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Fox News anchor Bill Hemmer gave a break down of the path to a 2020 victory for President Trump and his Democratic opponent, Joe Biden.

In a review of electoral votes needed to win in November, Hemmer took a closer look at three states that could play a pivotal role in how the results pan out and determine if Trump will score a reelection victory.


(Source: Fox News)

Hemmer presented a “What If” scenario Friday in getting each of the candidates to the “magic number” of the needed 270 electoral votes to clinch the presidency.

“I want to put a keen focus now on three states,” he said, noting Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania as potential battleground states in the race, as they were “razor-thin” in supporting Trump in 2016.

Using a U.S. map and the electoral tallies, with Biden at 213 and Trump with 126, Hemmer noted some states – marked in gray on the map – were within the margin of error in polling and considered “toss-up states.”

The Fox News anchor noted that Biden’s path to the 270 total could be easier if he accomplishes certain things such as winning the states of Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania which would give him a total of 259 electoral votes.

Biden could then look at concentrating on winning other key states to get him to the finish line, Hemmer suggested.

“Perhaps you flip in Arizona, that would do it. But again, that’s been Republican territory so a little tougher to do,” Hemmer said.

“Perhaps he holds on to Minnesota. If he does, he’s just one electoral vote away,” he added, noting that would leave Biden looking for just one other state to achieve the required number.

As for Trump, Hemmer said the “road is different.”

Using the “what if” scenario again, Hemmer looked at the president winning the same three key states and reaching a total of 172 electoral votes. Winning Georgia and Texas which maybe “isn’t as blue as they say it is,” would have to “defend” states that he won in 2016 such as Florida and North Carolina.

Holding on to some of the states he won in 2016, Trump could still get to the 270 needed electoral votes, Hemmer noted as he went back to the last presidential election to show close some of the results were when looking at the popular votes.

(Image: Fox News screenshot)

Wisconsin, with its 10 electoral votes, went to Trump in 2016 when he beat Hillary Clinton by just 22,000 votes. Clinton was widely panned for skipping a visit to Wisconsin during the general election campaign, and Biden has reportedly not campaigned there in person during his 2020 White House bid.

In Michigan, where 16 electoral votes are up for grabs, Trump beat Clinton in 2016 by 0.2% or less than 11,000 votes.

Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel promised that the president would be visiting Michigan soon despite Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s ongoing coronavirus restrictions.

“The president’s going to be back in Michigan,” McDaniel told The Detroit News. “We’re going to call it a peaceful protest, but we’re going to be there. That way the governor will allow it.”

Trump won Pennsylvania and its 10 electoral votes in 2016 with 44,000 votes. Biden hopes to take back the Keystone State for Democrats but Trump has focused some attention there as the former vice president was born in Scranton.

Hours before Biden accepted the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination this week, voters near his birth city came out in droves to welcome Trump who was speaking at a rally in Old Forge. Many were clear that Biden had not earned their vote and were vocal about their support of Trump.

“He had 40 years to make it right here, we’re still distressed,” one man who was “born and raised” in Biden’s birthplace of Scranton told Fox News contributor Lawrence Jones. “Eight years as vice president, what magical wand is he going to wave now to make it work?”

Biden left Pennsylvania as a child and eventually represented Delaware in the U.S. Senate from 1973 to 2009.

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Frieda Powers

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