‘Are we in Africa!?’ Scorching responses to NFL’s black national anthem keep coming

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The NFL’s plan to play the so-called “black national anthem” before all Week 1 games has provoked interesting responses — some of them hilarious, others outright scathing and one from Sen. Ted Cruz that was just straight-up real.

For the more lighthearted responses, one need only look to Kevin N. Hodge and Keith W. Hodge, two black conservatives known as the Hodge Twins. In a video response Friday, they sarcastically asked, “Are we in Africa!?

Nope, though one couldn’t be blamed for thinking otherwise.

Listen to their full response below:

“I don’t even think they got a black national anthem in Africa,” the duo added.

Only in America, the arguably freest country on Earth, does a so-called “black national anthem” exist, though as the Hodge Twins explained, it wasn’t meant to be an anthem.

“This song was actually written but to celebrate Abraham Lincoln’s birthday. White dude. He freed the slaves. You know, he was Republican,” they said.

Fact-check: TRUE.

It wasn’t until 1919 that the NAACP decided to co-opt the song as its own and transform it into a so-called “black national anthem.”

“Introduced in 1900 as a poem by African-American educator and activist James Weldon Johnson to mark Abraham Lincoln’s birthday, and later set to music by John Rosamond Johnson, ‘Lift Every Voice and Sing’ was adopted by the NAACP as a song of faith and freedom,” CBS News reported.

Now ironically, while the Hodge Twins’ response was both fun and informational, comedian Terrence Williams’ response was scathing hot like an iron.

“Do y’all not know how racist that sound? Are we really doing this!? Seriously!? Is this what we doing, America? What if there was a white national anthem — how would you feel? Oh, you wouldn’t like it, would you? No, you wouldn’t. You know you wouldn’t like it. Y’all would be crying right now if there was a white national anthem,” he said.

Listen:

He added that what Americans need — and already have — is a “national anthem for everybody — for black people, for white people, for Asians, for Hispanics, for everybody — not just for black people. Not just for white people. That’s racist.”

Yes, it is.

Ya’ll done lost ya’lls ever-lasting mind. What in the world is going on? We are supposed to be moving forward, not backwards. This is moving backwards. Martin Luther King did not march and die for a black national anthem,” he added.

Indeed, MLK died for a world where true equality would reign.

“I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.’ I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood,” he said in 1963, five years before his assassination.

“I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today!”

He lived and died for a dream of one America where all would stand side by side in equality — an America that in fact perfectly resembles the America of today:

Like Cruz wrote in the tweet above, we are now “ONE America. E Pluribus Unum.”

Or at least we should be, though the modern left is trying diligently to reverse the racial progress of the past by reinstituting segregation, bringing back discrimination and creating a dystopian world where everybody is equal, but some are more equal than others. The push to play the “black national anthem” is a perfect example of this.

“Did y’all know the national anthem, the ‘Star-Spangled Banner,’ that’s for everybody? It’s supposed to be unifying. When you come up with the black national anthem, that’s kind of divisive,” the Hodge Twins noted in their own response.

Exactly.

And neither they, Williams nor Cruz are alone in feeling like this.

Look:

What remains to be seen is how the public at large will react come Week 1.

According to the Hodge Twins, their plan is to give this pseudo-anthem the same treatment that the left has given to the national anthem.

If I’m at a basketball or football game and you call it the black national anthem, I gotta take a knee!” the brothers said.

Sounds fair! #TakeAKnee

 

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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