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Bubba Wallace, NASCAR’s only black driver, goes on CNN to call for ban of Confederate flags at races

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(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Bubba Wallace is the only black driver in NASCAR’s Cup Series, and after spending much of his career being hesitant to draw attention by engaging on matters of race, he is now embracing the platform he has to speak on the matter.

The change of attitude for the popular driver coming after the death of George Floyd, who died after an encounter with Minneapolis police, where an officer was captured on video pinning the deceased man down with a knee to his neck.

In an appearance on CNN, Wallace credited NASCAR with “[stepping] up to the plate big-time” on the issue of racism, and called for the ban of Confederate flags at tracks.

“My next step would be to get rid of all confederate flags,” Wallace said Monday night.

“No one should feel uncomfortable when they come to a NASCAR race,” he added. “It starts with confederate flags. Get them out of here. They have no place for them.”

Confederate flags have been a staple at NASCAR races over the years, and Wallace said that while he did not find them objectionable, he now understands that some do.

“There’s going to be a lot of angry people that carry those flags proudly, but it’s time for change,” he explained. “We have to change that, and I encourage NASCAR — we will have those conversations to remove those flags.”

NASCAR got its start in the south, as the sport evolved from the practice of running moonshine. It’s fan base remains decidedly southern — and conservative — although the sport has grown considerably from the early days.

The problem for Wallace is that he may be in over his head when it comes to politics in America today.

NASCAR drivers are considered to be among the best drivers in the world, and to be successful at that level, they must eat drink and sleep racing — most do anyway, out of pure love of the sport.

That Wallace would appear on Don Lemon’s show suggests he is unaware of how far left Lemon is, or how quickly the progressive left machine will chew him up and spit him out when its done using him — his first clue should have been when Lemon called him “Bubba Watson.”

In the segment, Lemon referenced President Trump, effectively calling the NASCAR fan base racists when he said “this is his base” — the comment seemed to go over the driver’s head.

And while Wallace has considerable fan support, even though Lemon just insinuated that race fans are racist — his appearance on Lemon’s show may alienate supporters.

On Sunday, at the Atlanta Motor Speedway race, Wallace wore a “Black Lives Matter” t-shirt.

Some of the top drivers in the sport, including retired driver Dale Earnhardt Jr., who remains the most popular figure in the sport, participated in a video shared over the weekend that spoke on Floyd’s death and racial equality.

Many of the drivers, to include Earnhardt, used a Black Lives Matter hashtag — this coming exactly one month shy of the 4 year anniversary of five Dallas police officers being killed by a gunman after a Black Lives Matter protest.

The problem with the “woke” NASCAR drivers is that they don’t grasp when it comes to the insatiable left, they will always hate the sport and those associated with it for its southern heritage alone.

When the Black Lives Matter movement first exploded on the scene, following the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, who was shot and killed when a Ferguson, Mo., police officer was forced to defend himself during an attack, NASCAR found itself in the political cross-hairs.

The sport responded in 2015 by asking its fans “to join us in a renewed effort to create an all-inclusive, even more welcoming atmosphere for all who attend our events. This will include the request from displaying the Confederate flag.”

NASCAR chairman Brian France went even further in a radio interview.

“We’ve taken the position that we need to disassociate ourselves with that symbol — that flag in every way that we can because it just represents a very offensive message,” he said. “Our tracks are working on the right kind of solution to work with our fans.”

Tom Tillison

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