‘They should pay you extra, Jim’: Acosta might be dizzy from all the spin he put on Trump’s briefing

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Following the White House’s latest coronavirus task force briefing Thursday, CNN’s fabricator in chief Jim Acosta proceeded to swamp the world with several blatant distortions of what President Donald Trump had said during the briefing.

After a top administration official outlined study results showing that outdoor conditions reduce the coronavirus’s half-life while disinfectants outright kill it, the president casually asked whether there might be a way to treat infected patients using this new knowledge.

“A question that probably some of you are thinking of if you’re totally into that world, which I find to be very interesting … supposing you brought the light inside the body, which you can do either through the skin or in some other way?” he first asked.

He then turned to disinfectants.

“And then I see the disinfectant, where it knocks it out in one minute,” he said. “And is there a way we can do something like that by injection inside or almost a cleaning?”

These were casual, off-the-cuff questions, yet speaking on CNN sometime later, Acosta falsely portrayed them as “medical advice.”

Listen:

“We want to caution everybody at home — please don’t do that, please don’t follow the president’s medical advice here,” he said in the clip above.

This is the same stunt he and other “journalists” pulled after a known Clinton supporter and her husband consumed fish tank cleaner that contained hydroxychloroquine and then proceeded to blame the president for their stupidity after the husband died.

It was bad faith, partisan nonsense, but the media ran with it anyway, arguing that the president’s decision to simply talk about the potential medical benefits of hydroxychloroquine was akin to him doling out medical advice.

While CNN’s media watchdogs Brian Stelter and Oliver Darcy have yet to call out either set of lies, plenty of Twitter users were on the job as of Thursday evening and Friday morning.

Look:

Acosta also distorted remarks made by coronavirus task force member Dr. Deborah Birx. Later during Thursday’s briefing, the president asked her directly whether sunlight/heat could be used as a direct “cure” for the coronavirus.

“I would like you to speak to the medical doctors to see if there’s any way that you can apply light and heat to cure. You know? If you could? And maybe you can, maybe you can’t,” he said.

“Again, I say maybe you can, maybe you can’t. I’m not a doctor. But I’m a person that has a good… You know what. Deborah, have you ever heard of that? The heat and the light relative to certain viruses, yes, but relative to this virus?”

Birx replied in the negative, saying, “Not as a treatment.”

It was a simple question and answer, yet Acosta portrayed the doctor’s reply as a loud, important disagreement of “Trump’s scientific ideas.”

Look:

And again it was left to members of social media to educate Acosta of the truth.

Look (*Language warning):

Unfortunately, these distortions are a commonplace, daily occurrence throughout the entire liberal mainstream media. The story about former FDA official Rick Bright is a perfect example of this.

On Wednesday, The New York Times ran a story claiming “[a] doctor who led a U.S. agency helping to develop a coronavirus vaccine says he was removed because he questioned the promotion of hydroxychloroquine.”

Later that evening, and after the phony story had already gone viral among America’s know-nothings, the real story emerged: According to Politico, Bright’s termination “was more than a year in the making,” meaning it had nothing to do with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Whoops.

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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