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Meghan McCain sends ‘thoughts and prayers’ to NY Times after hit piece on her

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This week The New York Times published the rant of a radical left-winger who openly despises conservative women, particularly the now-lone conservative voice on ABC’S “The View,” Meghan McCain.

In response, the 35-year-old conservative commentator and daughter of deceased Sen. John McCain mockingly turned the tables on the “thoughts and prayer”-hating left by sending the left-wing paper her “thoughts and prayers.”

Look:

To hear the Times’ columnist Shamira Ibrahim tell it, there’s no room on “The View” (or probably any other show) for pesky right-wingers and their “harmful rhetoric.”

Why does she feel this way? Because Ibrahim appears to be a radical left-winger who’s against the age-old notion of engaging in civil discourse/debate and agreeing to disagree.

This ‘agree to disagree’ stance is frustrating and lies in stark contrast with the current political moment, when many are skeptical of the idea of civil discourse and who it is meant to benefit,” she wrote.

By “many,” she meant members of the increasingly radical far-left, who not only believe that conservative voices need to be eliminated/canceled, but that those conservatives who speak out against this censorship are playing the victim card.

“When she appeared on the late-night talk show ‘Watch What Happens Live’ in September, [McCain] informed the host, Andy Cohen, that every day she assumes she could get fired, because of ‘the tone of where we are culturally,'” Ibrahim’s piece continued.

One might argue it’s a fair assumption given the left’s attempts to dole out punishment on opposing voices. After left-wingers complained, this week a Milwaukee dental assistant was reportedly fired from her job for posting the words “MAGA 2020” on Facebook. Other left-wingers meanwhile fumed first over actor Vince Vaughn speaking with the president and then over the LSU Tigers meeting with the president.

But Ibrahim doesn’t believe this is a fair assumption.

It’s a deflecting refrain that has been employed by standup comedians and political commentators alike — anyone bemoaning the rise of so-called cancel culture when facing pushback for harmful rhetoric,” she wrote.

And by “harmful rhetoric,” she meant words and statements that offend the sensibility of the increasingly anti-fact, anti-science left. Words such as “men are men,” for instance.

When McCain first learned of Ibrahim’s piece, she responded with the following tweet accusing the Times and its writers of, one, despising conservative women who support gun rights and oppose abortion, and two, wanting them to “all just go away.”

Look:

In response, Ibrahim basically wrote that the accusation — in so far as it pertains to her — is factually valid:

It wasn’t a surprising admission considering she’d described McCain as the “the privileged product of conservative nepotism, capitalism, and the American military-industrial complex.”

Actually, she’s the daughter of a now-deceased combat veteran who, besides earning numerous awards for his Vietnam War efforts, later became a senator.

What also wasn’t surprising was the Times’ decision to publish Ibrahim’s piece. That the paper let a rabid left-winger share her views about McCain is fine. Conservatives believe in free speech, after all.

But when you factor in that the Times’ op-eds almost always lean radically to the left, it does seemingly speak to the left’s growing insularity and echo chamber.

Even MSNBC commentator Joe Scarborough, an ostensible conservative though he tends to act more like a liberal, noted this.

Look:

Members of the left disagree, of course.

To them, it’s obvious that the piece is a gem of truth — especially given McCain’s even more “deplorable” sin: being WHITE.

Look:

Vivek Saxena

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